Steak Diane

On October 18, 2015, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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Steak Diane is one of my favorite stop top steak dishes. I love it so much I have another recipe on the website I did back in 2011 (check it out here.) This version doesn’t use cream, but it does use a lot of butter.  You can also remove the mushrooms in this version, but I had some beautiful chanterelle mushrooms I found at the Farmers’ Market.

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I was in downtown Los Angeles last Friday and made a stop at Grand Central Market to pick up some meat at Belcampo.  They had some petite top sirloin medallions that looked perfect.  I bought four to make this dish.  I often will use filet mignon, but these organic grass-fed top sirloin medallions add a richer flavor.

Steak Diane
Serves 2

4 petite top sirloin medallions, about 1 pound
5 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup Brandy
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce
1 shallot, minced
2 ounces chanterelle mushrooms, chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt & pepper

Add 2 tablespoons and the olive oil to a saute pan on high heat.  When it begins to bubble, add the salt and peppered steaks being cautious to not crowd the pan.

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Cook for five minutes on each side so there is a light browning.  Once both sides are cooked, place steaks on a plate covered with foil to keep warm.

Add the shallot and mushrooms to the pan and scrape up any browned bits.  Add the Brandy and light the pan on fire being careful of a high flame.  Add the lemon juice and worcestershire sauce and cook to combine for a minute.  Add the remaining butter to the pan and return the steaks.  Let it heat for another minute or two and then plate.

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Crockpot Apple Cider Beef Stew

On October 13, 2015, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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With temperatures staying in the 90s, and mostly high 90s, this October it really isn’t feeling like Fall yet.  So, I’ve decided to have Pinterest bring Fall to me. I bought some fresh squeezed apple cider from Whole Foods last Sunday and wanted to use it in a rich, flavorful stew.

After a few searches, I came across this recipe from The Tasty Kitchen. This Apple Cider Stew had everything I was looking for except it didn’t use a crockpot and I wanted to have it cook all day while I was at work.  With some minor tweaks, I made the recipe work for my crockpot. If you want the original recipe, check it out here.

Crockpot Apple Cider Beef Stew
Serves 4

1 1/2 lbs beef stew meat
1 tablespoon olive oil
3 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
salt & pepper
3 white or yukon gold potatoes, cubed
3 carrots, peeled and cut in 1/4″ slices
1 medium yellow onion, diced
4 cups chicken stock
1 cup water
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

Heat the olive oil in a large fry pan. Salt and pepper the beef and add to the hot oil pan.  Cook for 5 minutes on each side to brown pieces. Do not crowd the pan.  Once done remove from heat.  Take a gallon size ziploc bag and add the flour, thyme, cinnamon, salt and pepper.  Add the cooked stew beef to the bag and lock then shake to coat the beef.

Add the potatoes, carrots and onions to the crockpot.  Pour the floured beef out of the bag and into the crockpot.  Add the liquids and some additional salt and pepper.

Cook on low heat for 10 hours or high heat for 5 hours in the crockpot.  When done, if sauce is not as thick as you’d like do the following: Combine 2 tablespoon of cornstarch and 4 tablespoons of water then pour and stir into crockpot mixture and let it cook for another 10 minutes, it doesn’t matter if it’s on high or low heat.

Serve with a hearty bread.

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Sous-vide Carne Asada Street Tacos

On June 24, 2015, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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I make a lot of vegetarian dishes during the week, mostly because anything with meat takes too long to cook from the time I get home from work. One of the ways to make using meat easier and ready when I walk through the door is to use a style of cooking called sous-vide. It is a French style of cooking a vacuum-packed meat or vegetable slowly in a water bath.

Unlike a crockpot where you don’t want to overcook too much, sous-vide allows for a wide range of time for when the meat is ready. In the case of this recipe, the meat can be removed from the water bath anytime between 7 to 24 hours. That means if I’m running late or early from work, it doesn’t really matter.

The green tortillas in the photo are cactus corn tortillas I bought at Super A Foods. You can use any tortilla you like.

I use a Sous-vide Supreme, but there are other sous-vide products on the market.

Sous-vide Carne Asada Street Tacos
Makes 12-16 tacos

1 lb flank steak
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
1 red onion, diced
corn tortillas
vegetable oil
2 limes, quartered
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
hot sauce

Season the flank steak with cumin, salt, pepper and 2 tablespoons of chopped cilantro. Reserve remaining cilantro. Place seasoned flank steak in a vacuum sealed bag. Seal bag and place in sous-vide water bath. Cook at 145 degree temperature for 7 to 24 hours.

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Heat outdoor grill on high. After you have cooked the flank steak, remove from vacuum sealed bag and dispose of any liquid marinade.  Place steak on grill and grill for 5 minutes on each side (300 degree temperature.)

Meanwhile, heat oil in saute pan. When hot add a corn tortilla and heat for a few seconds on each side flipping using tongs.  Place finished tortillas on paper towel.  Pad off excess grease with paper towel. Continue until finished heating all tortillas.

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Chop onions and cilantro and mix together. Slice flank steak and rough chop into small chunks. Assemble tacos adding meat, onions, and cilantro to each tortilla.  Serve with a sliced limes and hot sauce.

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Mongolian Beef

On February 18, 2015, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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I used to love P.F. Chang’s when it first came on the scene, but over the years my desire for it trailed off. I went a few years ago and the dishes are just too salty like a lot of chain restaurants.  So when I came across a recipe from another food blogger I enjoy – Kelly at Just a Taste, I figured it was time to bring back Mongolian Beef to my dinner choices.

This is a simple dish any new cook can make and there are some good tips any good Chinese food lover will want to take note.  I’ve used corned starch coating since becoming aware of that technique back in the early 1990s when a friend shared their favorite stir fry recipe.

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There is a lot of brown sugar, so please don’t consider this a healthy dish.  There’s a 3/4 cup of brown sugar in the sauce! So I wouldn’t make this every week or even every month.

I also added broccoli when I reheated some leftovers the next day, so feel free to mix it up with some other vegetable options.

For the beef, I used Novy Ranch flat iron steak and picked up some green onions at the Studio City Farmers Market last weekend.

Full Recipe: [30-Minute Mongolian Beef]

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The Pioneer Woman’s Pot Roast

On December 31, 2014, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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Christmas Day is a perfect day for a pot roast and especially one I have had on my short list for most of 2014. I loved the simplicity of The Pioneer Woman’s Pot Roast recipe I had ran across searching Pinterest one day. I added some potatoes to it since I like a little more than just carrots and onions. I simply cook potatoes in a small saucepan for 10 minutes in boiling water and add it to the dutch oven in the last 30 minutes before the recipe is done.

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I followed the rest of the recipe as stated on The Pioneer Woman’s blog. You definitely want to use fresh herbs for this one, so don’t forget to pick some up at the market.

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The combination of red wine and beef stock makes a beautiful gravy. This is a perfect pot roast and pretty hard to screw up. Good luck and Happy New Year!

Full Recipe: [Perfect Pot Roast]

 

 

 

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A Simple Pot Roast on Christmas Day

On December 30, 2013, in Family, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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Slow cooking is one of the best ways to enjoy a home cooked after a busy day.  This busy day was Christmas here in Los Angeles where it was a crisp 80 degrees outside.  So we needed something comforting and cozy after opening gifts and sledding.

Sledding?

Yes, sledding. See we decided to get into the Christmas spirit by driving to Zuma Beach where we noticed they had large hills of sand.  We packed the station wagon with the proper winter cargo:  beach blankets and a snow sled.

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Apparently we were not the only people in Southern California who realized Christmas Day 2013 was a perfect day for the beach. All along the coastline we saw cars parked and people playing on the beach as if it were mid-July.  We drove along the Pacific Coast Highway through Santa Monica and Malibu eventually arriving at Zuma Beach.  There were probably ten other families laying out enjoying the warm December sunshine.

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We climbed up the sandhill with our sled and proceeded to cruise down the bumpy hill. After a few slides down, the sand became smooth as some other kids joined our boys to try it out.  We quickly found out that four kids on the sled really made it a fun, quick ride.

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Eventually, our time sledding Zuma Beach came to an end and we hopped back into the car to head home.  The whole time, the pot roast was cooking slowly in the crockpot waiting for when we were ready for it; instead, of most meals that are ready when it’s ready.

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I used the following recipe but instead of using a Dutch oven to slow cook the roast, I simply did steps 1-6 in a Dutch Oven and then transferred everything to a crockpot putting  it on low temperature for 8-10 hours. Just make sure you get all of the goodness of the pan when deglazing before transferring to a crockpot.

Full Recipe: Pioneer Woman’s Pot Roast.

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Smoked Tri-Tip Roast with Chanterelle Brandy Cream Sauce

This is my now my official submission to theSousVide Supreme BBQ Recipe Challenge! Please visit the link and vote for me before July 7th! Each person who casts a vote for their fan favorite will be entered to win a $200 gift certificate to www.sousvidesupreme.com!

My time with the SousVide Supreme is coming to an end soon.  It’s been an creative addition to the kitchen and there is a lot I’d still like to experiment with as I continue to see how it bests fits into our home cooking routine.  Two of its best qualities are exemplified in this recipe.

  1. It makes cooking a roast easy while maintaining it’s tenderness.
  2. The time span for when it is ready to eat makes it simple and flexible for cooking a great meal after work.

The second reason is one of my favorite things about sous-vide cooking.  In this case, the tri-tip roast can be left in the water bath for 8-24 hours. Think about that.  If the day at work runs a couple hours long like mine did last Thursday, no worries. Come home and remove it from the SousVide Supreme and make a quick cream sauce that takes 5 minutes.  Dinner served (though my mashed potatoes took a good 12 minutes. So not quite that fast.)

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Looks pretty nice too on the counter.

This recipe was also the first time I used my smoker in conjunction with the SousVide Supreme.  I was a bit concerned that only 2 hours in the smoker wouldn’t add that much smoke flavor to the roast.  Fortunately, my concern was unwarranted as the roast had a great smoky flavor that added to the rich mushroom brandy sauce.

Note: I’d recommend any hearty mushrooms for this sauce. Morels would’ve been great too or even portobello. A strong flavor mushroom combined with the smoked meat is a bit odd at first, because its something unusual. Good thing it is a good unusual. 

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Chanterelle mushrooms were a great find at the Farmers’ Market

I believe the secret to keeping the smoke flavor in the meat is to quickly remove it from the smoker and into a vacuum sealed bag.  If you want more of a smoked flavor, you could put the meat in the freezer for a hour or two before placing it in the smoker. This way you can add another 30 or 45 minutes to the cooking time in the smoker. Just be careful not to totally freeze the meat.

Smoked Tri-Tip Roast with Chanterelle Brandy Cream Sauce

Serves 4

2 lb tri-tip roast

Rub

1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Sauce

3/4 cup heavy cream
3 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup Brandy
1/2 cup Chanterelle mushrooms, course chop
1 garlic clove, diced
1 shallot, diced
1 tablespoon fresh italian parsley, finely chopped

The night before mix the ingredients to make the rub and coat the tri-tip roast.  Then cover in dish with cellophane and place in the refrigerator overnight.

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Into the smoker the rubbed tri-tip goes.

Early the next morning prepare your smoker by getting it to a steady 220 degree temperature. Place the tri-tip roast into the smoker and cook it for 2 hours at 220 degrees.  When done, remove it from the smoker and quickly place the roast into a plastic bag. Vacuum seal the roast and submerge into a SousVide Supreme cooker.

Set the SousVide Supreme to 140 degrees and let it cook for anytime between 8-12 hours.

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Time is of essence. Quickly seal after removing from smoker.

Start making the sauce by placing 2 tablespoons of butter into a sauté pan. Add the garlic and shallot and sauté for about 3 minutes to soften on medium-high heat.  Add the Brandy and let it reduce by half.  Then add the Chanterelle mushrooms and sauté for another 2-3 minutes letting the mushrooms soften. Add the heavy cream and salt and pepper.  Let the cream come to a boil then reduce the heat to medium-low and watch to not burn the sauce. It’s best to keep moving the pan to let the flavors blend and to reduce too much boiling of the cream.

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Brandy, mushrooms, cream and butter. One of my favorite combinations.

Once the sauce is ready add the last tablespoon of butter just before serving, remove the tri-tip roast from the SousVide Supreme and remove from the vacuum sealed pack.  Slice the roast against the grain into 1/2 inch slices. Arrange the meat on the plate.

Finally with the sauce add the chopped parsley and 1 tablespoon of butter.  Let the butter melt into the sauce and stir. Serve the sauce with the roast and any sides.


DISCLAIMER: I was sent the SousVide Supreme to try as part of a blogger outreach program from the company.  The opinions are my own.

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Korean BBQ Tacos using a SousVide Supreme

On May 27, 2013, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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I’m a very lucky person. There are many reasons: a wonderful family, a loving wife, and once a week the Kogi Korean BBQ taco truck makes a stop right behind the building I work. An order of three short rib tacos makes any day better. It makes life better.

Now I love traditional Mexican street tacos, so much so I have written a ton of reviews on a particular kind of taco – the gas station taco. This passion has led me to appreciate what makes a great taco. The perfect taco combines the elements of a slightly oily handmade corn tortilla, perfectly cooked meat, and the right amount of spices with just enough cilantro and chopped onions to compliment, not overpower the meat, then topped with a smooth, spicy hot sauce. That’s the perfect Mexican street taco.

The Korean taco is an entirely different beast.

Fusion cooking is the mixing of various cultures and is something that can go massively wrong or massively right. The Korean BBQ Taco is fusion and Chef Roy who owns Kogi does it massively right.

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Fresh made corn tortillas

If you’re unfamiliar with the Korean BBQ taco, you’re missing out. It’s sweet, spicy and crunchy. The meat is sauced with a good wet marinade that caramelizes the meat complimented by cilantro-onion-lime relish, topped with lightly pickled cabbage and hot sauce. It’s pure fusion. Combining the elements of Korea’s most famous food this decade – Korean BBQ – with Mexico’s most famous dish – tacos.

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A stack of tortillas after they’ve being heated.

I have been meaning to attempt the Korean BBQ taco at home.  Not copying Kogi, but rather making my own version that’s inspired by the Kogi truck.

This recipe is just that. It’s my own creation of the Korean BBQ taco and to make the meat as tender and flavorful as possible I decided I’d try a new style of cooking while I’m at it. I was contacted by SousVide Supreme who wanted to see what I could do using the sous-vide method (translates to “under vacuum”.) This looked like an excellent opportunity to make a tough meat, I used flat iron steak instead of short ribs, into something tender and juicy. Plus how more fusion can you get then a Mexican taco + Korean BBQ + French cooking method.

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SousVide Supreme with vacuum pouch sealer

Sous-vide involves cooking a vacuum sealed bag of meat or vegetables submerged in water at a consistent temperature. The method produces food that is cooked on the outside and inside at the same “doneness” without overcooking, while keeping the food juicy.  The consistent temperature of the water allows you to have the food ready in a large window of time. For example, the flat iron steak I made is ready anytime between 8 to 24 hours great for a long Memorial Day weekend when our family is running around having fun not knowing exactly when we’ll be home for dinner.

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Marinated flat iron steak submerged in SousVide Supreme

We spent the afternoon at Santa Monica Beach enjoying the warm California sun and flying our kites.

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When we came home and removed the flat iron steak from the SousVide Supreme I sliced off a small piece to try it. It was perfect.  It really was juicy and full of flavor. I placed it out on the grill to give it some grill marks and crunch.

Cooked flat iron steak in Korean BBQ marinade

Cooked flat iron steak in Korean BBQ marinade

Look how nicely cooked it was after cooking in the water at 140 degrees for 9 hours.

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A perfect medium

I did make my own tortillas for this recipe, but you don’t have to go that extra step. Just be sure to find some good quality corn tortillas and revitalize them in a saute pan with a little oil.  Heat the oil on medium-high heat and place a tortilla in for 10 seconds and then flip for another 5 seconds remove and place on some paper towels, patting off the excess oil. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Later this month, I’m competing with several other BBQ bloggers at http://www.sousvidesupreme.com/sousvidebbq.htm. Check back after June 25 to see what recipe I decide to enter and send me a vote if you want. As a bonus, each person who casts a vote for their fan favorite will be entered to win a $200 gift certificate to www.sousvidesupreme.com.

DISCLAIMER: I was sent the SousVide Supreme to try as part of a blogger outreach program from the company.  The opinions are my own.

Sous-Vide Korean BBQ Tacos

Prep Time: 20 Mins Cooking Time: 8 Hours Total Time: 8 Hours

Ingredients:

  • 2 lb. flat iron steak

Marinade

  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • 5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sriracha sauce
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice

Pickled Cabbage

  • 1/2 head of cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon lime juice

Cilantro relish

  • 1 bunch cilantro, finely chopped
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • juice from 1 lime

Directions:

  1. Combine the marinade ingredients and whisk together. Place the meat in the marinade and let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. In the morning, remove the flat iron steak and place into a vacuum pouch pour in about 2 tablespoons of the marinade into the vacuum pouch. Seal the steak using a vacuum food sealer.
  2. Fill up a SousVide Supreme with water and place the rack and sealed meat into the cooker. Set the heat to 140 degrees for medium doneness and let it cook for 8 hour or up to 24 hours. After 8 hours the meat is ready, the remaining time is just flex time that will keep the meat at the final cooked heat without over cooking.
  3. Meanwhile before the meat is ready to be removed from the SousVide Supreme, make the pickled cabbage and cilantro relish.
  4. For the cabbage, combine all of the ingredients together in a bowl and cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours for the flavors to combine.
  5. The cilantro relish is made by simply combining the ingredients in a bowl and setting aside. This can be made right before taking the meat out.
  6. When the meat is ready, remove from the water and cut the vacuum pouch open. Remove the flat iron steak and place on a hot grill for a few minutes to give it some char. Remove and slice into small cubes for the taco.
  7. On each tortilla, place some meat followed by the cilantro relish and then the cabbage on top. Pour on some hot sauce too if you desire and serve.
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Texas Brisket for #SundaySupper

On May 18, 2013, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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When I read this week’s SundaySupper theme was “Low & Slow” I knew exactly what I wanted to make and where I would get inspiration from.  As regular readers of my blog will know, this site has been taken over by a lot of slow cooking – cooking in a smoker to be exact. After returning from South by Southwest in Austin last March, I had a constant craving for barbecue. Smoked barbecue was constantly on my mind since I had my first and so far only taste of the most amazing brisket I’ve had in my life at Franklin Barbecue.

A coworker and I went to Franklin’s pretty late which was quite risky since the line is usually 3 hours and when they run out that’s it. No more and that time today was right around 1:15pm when we showed up and got behind a few people waiting outside the door.  About three minutes after getting in line someone from the restaurant comes out to put a “sold out today” sign on the door telling us they’re out, but they may have some scraps.

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At this point, we are good with scraps.  We waited in line with about 6 other people and when we finally made it to the counter there was one last perfectly cooked brisket just for us. No scraps!  Instead we had some amazing brisket that day.

I still can’t get that meal out of my mind (or is it taste-buds?)  It was an unforgetable food experience similar to the first time I went to Mario Batali’s Babbo Restaurant in New York City back in the early 2000’s. That meal change my perspective on Italian food forever. Franklin Barbecue changed my perspective on Southern barbecue forever and I knew I had to find a way to make that experience come home, just like how I learned to cook a few dishes like Batali’s Mint Love Letters ravioli.

For the next month I research smokers. Wood smokers. Ceramic smokers. Electric smokers. All kinds of options and read a ton of articles and message boards talking about perfect brisket and what it takes to get that great dark, Texas crunch and smoked flavor I had in Austin.

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When it came down to a final decision between a CookShack electric smoker and a ceramic Big Green Egg smoker, I went electric.  Now I knew this sacrificed me ever fully replicating Franklin Barbecue, but I knew I could get close. Heck I’d probably only just get close and that would still be pretty amazing.

So here I am on my second attempt at brisket in my CookShack smoker.  The first attempt was great, but it was a little too complex in the steps and came out a little too dry.  Plus last time I made a rookie mistake when buying the meat and bought what’s called a “flat” brisket.  What you really want is a “point” brisket. The point is that extra flap of the beef shoulder that most butchers cut-off from the brisket. Fortunately, I’ve found a great local butcher who specializes in grass-fed beef and I called them last Tuesday, literally when the cow arrives, and asked for a point brisket that ended up being a little over 9 pounds.

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I also found Aaron Franklin, the owner of Franklin Barbecue, in some YouTube videos talking about how he cooks brisket.

Here it is my second attempt. It was definitely an improvement, but I still have some work.  Mostly I left too much fat on.  Be sure to cut most of the fat off and watch Aaron’s video for some tips. I didn’t completely follow the instructions which I will next time. Basically, you want to remove most of the fat and keep some. Again, watch the video to learn more.

Don’t forget to check out the fabulous line up of recipes for today’s Low and Slow #SundaySupper

Low & Slow Breads & Starters:

Low & Slow Mains:

Low & Slow Sides:

Low & Slow Desserts:

Wine Pairing Recommendations for Low & Slow Food from ENOFYLZ Wine Blog

Don’t forget to join the #SundaySupper chat on Twitter Sunday to discuss cooking low and slow! We’ll tweet throughout the day and share our delicious recipes. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm EST. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag, and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more delicious recipes and food photos.

Check out the Food & Wine Conference sponsored by Sunday Supper! Being held July 19th – 21st in beautiful, sunny Orlando, FL. It’s a must for food bloggers. Find out more here ? Food & Wine Conference

 

Texas Brisket

Prep Time: 15 Mins Cooking Time: 11 Hours Total Time: 11 Hours 15 Mins

Ingredients:

  • 9-10 lb point brisket
  • 1/2 cup ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup sea salt
  • 1/8 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground chipotle pepper

Directions:

  1. Trim the brisket removing most of the fat, but keeping some about a 1/4″ thick.
  2. Mix the rub ingredients together in a small bowl or shaker. Coat the brisket and let it refrigerate overnight.
  3. Heat smoker to 225 degrees. Place brisket in smoker.
  4. About 2 hours spray quickly with apple juice in a spray bottle.
  5. Remove brisket in 4 hours and wrap in butcher paper or aluminum foil. Spray apple juice and cover.
  6. Remove foil in last hour of cooking when meat temperature reaches 185 degrees. Spray with apple juice and place back in smoker until meat reaches 195 degree internal temperature.
  7. Serve.
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My Meat Prayers have been Answered

On May 4, 2013, in Featured, Food, by Chris Baccus
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Thank you Meat God.

When we moved out of Texas last year to come back to my home state California, one thing I knew I’d miss was Burgundy Pasture Beef.  The ranch in Grandview, Texas was a gem in where I sourced my meats. We would drive to the ranch about every 6 weeks (it was a hour drive south of Dallas) and get $300-$400 of meat while enjoying some of the best burgers in my life. Life was good. I had found an amazing small ranch, grass-fed beef place I loved going to visit and support with my dollars.

Los Angeles is not Dallas. Or is it California is not Texas?

LA is not full of ranches within a hour drive and the area is known more for vegetarian, raw food which I love too, but it just isn’t a mecca for beef like Texas.  So I went around the local Farmers’ Markets and bought from a couple good grass-fed vendors.  Nothing was that impressive and at least I found some sources outside of the supermarkets or mail order.

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That’s when fate intervened.  We were interviewing some interns for a open position we had where I work and one of the interns mentioned she was doing social media for an organic, grass-fed butcher in Los Angeles called Lindy and Grundy. My ears perked up and I asked her to tell us more about the place, where it was and what she was learning about grass-fed meat. I noted the place and went to it that Saturday when the weekend arrived. I’ve been back since about four times.

Lindy & Grundy sells local, pastured raised, organic meats including beef, pork, chicken and a few other options. I had the pleasure this week of finally meeting one of the two owners Amelia Posada. She was great sharing how she spent some of her time growing up in Pasadena just like myself. I bought some beautiful baby back ribs, chicken, and Amelia’s family recipe pork carnitas.

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We had the carnitas tonight. Oh. My. God. They were delicious. The lard, oranges, garlic and spices brought out so much wonderful flavor I couldn’t stop eating. The shop was also selling fresh tortillas today from the Boyle Heights location of Guisados Tacos. Writing about this I’m now thinking of raiding the refrigerator to make another taco.

So while I love doing vegetarian/vegan meals every 3 to 4 times a week, having a great place to get high quality, sustainable, grass-fed meats is a blessing to my meat quest. Amen.

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