Grilled Corn Asparagus Pasta with Brown Butter Breadcrumbs

On September 15, 2013, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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Our family is moving closer to becoming vegetarian. For the past several years we have made it a point to eat 2 to 3 vegetarian dishes a week for dinner. The past year it’s been 4 or 5 dinners a week. Finding recipes that don’t use meat is not easy in a society that consumes so much of it.

When I find new vegetarian dishes that make me forget I’m not eating meat and thereby not missing it, it’s a good thing.

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This dish sounded a bit odd, but I had bought some corn this week and wasn’t sure what do with it until I saw this post from one of my fellow Sunday Supper bloggers, Paula at Vintage Kitchen Notes. The thought of anything other than a marinara sauce on spaghetti noodles just feels foreign, which is pretty funny considering how experimental I am with food. Also, the dish really doesn’t have a sauce, it uses the brown butter and breadcrumbs to coat the noodles. And what no Parmigiano-Reggiano?  Feta? Feta on spaghetti? Sacreligious.

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The dish does take some time, about 30-40 minutes. It is great for a quick weekend meal than a rushed after work meal.

The full recipe is below. I followed it with one exception. Stephanie doesn’t like jalapenos so I substituted red chili pepper flakes, 1/2 teaspoon.

Full Recipe: Charred Corn Asparagus Pasta with Brown Butter Breadcrumbs

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Jägerschnitzel for #SundaySupper

On January 19, 2013, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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This week’s Sunday Supper theme is Retro Recipes.  I was reminded a couple weeks ago about one of my favorite restaurants when I made some German Lentil Soup from Portland Oregon’s Der Rheinlander. The soup was great, but it was missing something. Something I loved to eat as a child – Jägerschnitzel.  It was one of the few ways I would eat mushrooms, the other being on supreme pizza.

Jägerschnitzel is basically a bacon mushroom cream sauce on a wiener-schnitzel  I had the recipe for Der Rheinlander’s basic schnitzel.  All I needed was some inspiration for a mushroom cream sauce.  I found a few on the web, but had an amazing mushroom cream sauce I’ve made many times before. Add some bacon and onions and I would be whisked back to the early 1980s eating a Jägerschnitzel in Portland.

I may have the oldest of the retro recipes in this week’s Sunday Supper event.  Both the Austrians and Italians claim to have invented the wiener-schnitzel. The Italians claim the dish was made in 1134 at a banquet for the canon of Milan’s St. Ambrogio Cathedral.

Now that’s retro.

Jägerschnitzel
Serves 4

4 veal scallopini, pounded thin
2 whole eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon milk
1 lemon, juice
1 1/2 cups bread crumbs
1/4 cup canola oil
2 tablespoons butter
flour, to coat
salt and pepper to taste
1 lemon cut into wedges

Mushroom Cream Sauce
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 cup cremini mushrooms, diced and quartered
1 tablespoon cream sherry
1 slice bacon, small diced
1/2 onion, diced
1 shallot, diced
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoons butter
small bunch parsley

For the schnitzel, wrap veal cutlets in cellophane and pound with a mallet. Heat a saute pan on medium-high heat with oil and butter.

Rub some lemon juice over the veal and then dredge the veal in flour.  A simple way to do this is to use a gallon ziplock bag and place about a 1/2 cup flour in the bag and shake the bag to coat the veal.  Remove veal from bag and now with the egg and milk mixed together in small bowl, coat the flour dredged veal in the egg and shake so it is not dripping egg and coat with bread crumbs.

Add the bread crumb coated veal to the saute pan and cook on each side until the bread crumbs are nicely browned, not burned, about 3-4 minutes each side.  Remove the cooked veal from the saute pan and place on a plate.

Now to make the sauce, add the bacon and cook for about 2-3 minutes.  Add the mushrooms, onions, shallot, and thyme and cook for about 2 minutes then deglaze the pan with the cream sherry. Once the sherry has cooked off, about 1 minute, add the heavy cream and butter. Add the parsley and reduce heat to a simmer and place the cooked breaded veal back in the pan.

After letting flavors combine for a couple minutes, serve with spätzle and some vegetables.

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Join us Around the Family Table this Sunday at 7pm Eastern Time and share your favorite Retro Food Memory with us!

Sunday Supper Retro Appetizers:
Sunday Supper Retro Salads:
Sunday Supper Retro Breads and Sandwiches:
SundaySupper Main Dishes:
Sunday Supper Retro Sides and Veggies:
Sunday Supper Retro Desserts and Cocktails:

Sunday Supper MovementI’d love to hear about some of your favorite Retro Recipes!  Feel free to leave links and/or recipes in the comments.  Also, feel free to join us for our live twitter chat tonight at 7pm (Eastern) using the#SundaySupper hashtag, and check out the Sunday Supper board on Pinterest.

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This recipe was inspired by a post from blogger Emily Levenson, Zucchini Patties with Tahini Sauce. The zucchini patties are quite versatile and can also be served in a pita with a yogurt sauce or done with tahini dipping sauce and a small side salad.

What I really like about this recipe is how quick and flavorful the patties are. They take about five minutes to make when using a food processor and only about 10 minutes to cook.

Spinach Salad with Zucchini Patties and Champagne Vinegar Dressing
Serves 4

1 15oz can of chickpeas, rinsed and drained
2 zucchinis
1 red onion
1 cup bread crumbs
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tsp of salt

Baby Spinach
4 strawberries, thinly sliced

Champagne Dressing
1/4 cup Champagne vinegar
1 garlic clove, finely minced
1 tsp dijon mustard
2 tablespoons olive oil
ground pepper to taste

 

Mash chickpeas into a paste. Combine the rest of the first 6 ingredients into the mashed chickpea mixture.

Combine and then form patties.

Pan fry zucchini patties in saute pan with a tablespoon of olive oil and tablespoon of butter.

Prepare the Champagne vinegar and plate spinach and strawberries.  Add patties on top of salad and drizzle vinaigrette.

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My First Attempt at an Alice Waters’ Recipe

On August 26, 2011, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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It’s no secret to those who read this blog regularly that I am an advocate of local food, but I’m just another person in this movement. The chef most responsible for giving local food a renewed prominence is without a doubt Alice Waters. Her restaurant Chez Panisse is a mecca for the local food movement. I still haven’t been to Berkeley, California even though I was born in California and lived there for 11 years, but 99% of my time was spent in Los Angeles.

With no near term plans for a trip to Berkeley, I decided to pick up one of Alice’s cookbooks from a Border’s that was closing (sad to see Border’s go.) I found a copy of her Pasta, Pizza, Calzone cookbook.

The book is organized by season since her cooking philosophy is using fresh, local ingredients of course that means fresh and local in her region of Northern California so it’s not always local to everyone. I did find one recipe that met local, fresh ingredients for an August in Texas. I found some great Sweet 100 local tomatoes at Whole Foods and bought some basil and made fresh linguine pasta. The recipe also called for bread crumbs, olive oil, red wine vinegar and salt and pepper. It was very simple, almost too simple.

The flavor was okay, but that was mainly due to the recipe calling for an unnecessary large amount of bread crumbs – 1 1/2 cups. I reduced it to 1 cup and even then only used about a 1/4 of a cup and that was still too much for two people. The recipe should’ve called for a teaspoon garnish on top for each dish and it’s a change I’ll make on my next attempt at this.

The Sweet 100 tomatoes were excellent as they provided such a vibrant, summer taste that really brought out the joys of simple summer food which I’m sure was the whole point.

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