Steak Diane

On October 18, 2015, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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Steak Diane is one of my favorite stop top steak dishes. I love it so much I have another recipe on the website I did back in 2011 (check it out here.) This version doesn’t use cream, but it does use a lot of butter.  You can also remove the mushrooms in this version, but I had some beautiful chanterelle mushrooms I found at the Farmers’ Market.

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I was in downtown Los Angeles last Friday and made a stop at Grand Central Market to pick up some meat at Belcampo.  They had some petite top sirloin medallions that looked perfect.  I bought four to make this dish.  I often will use filet mignon, but these organic grass-fed top sirloin medallions add a richer flavor.

Steak Diane
Serves 2

4 petite top sirloin medallions, about 1 pound
5 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup Brandy
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce
1 shallot, minced
2 ounces chanterelle mushrooms, chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt & pepper

Add 2 tablespoons and the olive oil to a saute pan on high heat.  When it begins to bubble, add the salt and peppered steaks being cautious to not crowd the pan.

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Cook for five minutes on each side so there is a light browning.  Once both sides are cooked, place steaks on a plate covered with foil to keep warm.

Add the shallot and mushrooms to the pan and scrape up any browned bits.  Add the Brandy and light the pan on fire being careful of a high flame.  Add the lemon juice and worcestershire sauce and cook to combine for a minute.  Add the remaining butter to the pan and return the steaks.  Let it heat for another minute or two and then plate.

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Pasta with Roasted Asparagus and Balsamic Butter

On May 27, 2011, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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In our family’s quest to try to eat 3 to 4 vegetarian dinners a week, I have turned to blogs like Emily Levenson’s {Custom Made} Life.

Tonight I attempted a rather peculiar recipe that uses a lot of balsamic vinegar and butter (in this case Earth Balance) to make a pasta sauce. Of course with any recipe that calls for balsamic as a key ingredient for success a quality balsamic vinegar is necessary. For tonight, I went with an Organic local selection that we found at the Addison Farmer’s Market late last year.

The balsamic vinegar is made by Texas Hill Country Olive Company. Their Terra Verde Traditional balsamic is a really fruity, rich, thick balsamic that has such an amazing sweetness to it that it really made for an excellent choice for this dish which calls for a 1/3 of a cup of vinegar. Plus Terra Verde’s vinegar is reasonably priced at $16 for a 250ml bottle and can be ordered online too.

The only change I made to Emily’s recipe was using lumaconi pasta shells instead of whole wheat penne which I thought I had, but did not. The shell shape of lumaconi did great and the thick syrupy sauce adhered to the noodles nicely, only downside is lumaconi means “giant snails” in Italian so that’s not so appetizing. Also, I recommend adding some imported Parmesan-Reggiano to add to the dish’s nutty, rich flavor.

For the Recipe: Pasta with Roasted Asparagus and Balsamic Butter

Homemade Ravioli with Ricotta and Asparagus

On March 27, 2011, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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This dish was requested by my wife. Years ago before we had our twin boys I had made this dish one evening in Northern Michigan staying at my in-laws cottage in Lake Leelanau. It was in my Mario Batali phase where I was watching his cooking show on FoodTV and had even had a few meals at his restaurant Babbo’s in New York City.

Two key things I learned from Batali during this phase. One, don’t over-sauce your pasta. Just gently coat the pasta. Two, use fresh pasta because dry pasta just doesn’t make a great pasta dish.

I took a course at William-Sonoma’s at the Somerset Collection a couple years ago that showed me how to make great homemade pasta using our Kitchen Aide mixer with the optional pasta attachment.

Basic Pasta Dough

2 1/3 cups flour
1 cup semolina flour
1 tsp salt
1 Tbs olive oil
4 eggs
2 Tbs water, plus more as needed

Combine the first three ingredients in the mixer and mix for 30 seconds on a low speed. In a separate bowl, combine the last three ingredients using a whisk to combine.

Pour the liquid mixture slowly in phases to the flour mixture with the Kitchen Aide using the flat beater to combine. Do this until the dough can be formed, but not sticky. Add a little extra water, 1 tsp at a time as needed to get right consistency.

Separate into two balls then wrap in plastic and flatten into discs (see image below.) Let them rest room temperature for 30 minutes.


Dust a cutting board lightly with flour. Cut off a 1/4 of a piece from the wrapped discs of pasta dough and roll out with a rolling pin in a rectangular shape until flat enough to go through the Kitchen Aid pasta attachment on setting #1 (thickest setting.)

Have the pasta pass through the extractor each time lessening the number by one until you pass it through on #7. Fold the pasta over two times and then repeat the process two complete times and now you should have a long, almost see-through piece of pasta. Cut and set aside.

Repeat this process with remaining pasta dough.


Cut each pasta sheet so that you can fold over a piece with a dollup of the ricotta mixture. To make the ricotta mixture combine 1 cup of ricotta cheese, 2 tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese and 1 tablespoon of olive oil and blend with a fork. Place 1 teaspoon of mixture on each pasta square. Wet the edges with a little water and seal each ravioli.


Bring a pot of water to boil, salt, and cook the pasta for about 5 minutes until tender.

In a separate saute pan make the sage butter sauce.

Sage Butter Sauce

5 Tbs of butter
3 Tbs of chopped fresh sage (do not use dried)
salt and pepper to taste

Add the butter and brown it on medium-high heat. Once all melted and getting a dark color add the sage and cook for 15 seconds and then add the cooked ravioli. Toss in some cooked asparagus too (optional) and serve immediately with some grated Parmesan.

Enjoy!

 

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