Braised Curry Cabbage

On March 20, 2016, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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I mostly write and share main dishes from my kitchen, but today I spent a few minutes in the morning braising cabbage to enjoy throughout the week.

Braised cabbage is a wonderful dish that makes a great side to enjoy with many styles of cooking. This particular dish has a Southeast Asian vibe with garlic, ginger and curry powder bringing it to life.

The best part is this dish takes about 5 minutes of preparation and only 15 minutes of cooking.

Braised Curry Cabbage
Serves 4

1 whole cabbage, cut into large bite-sized pieces
1/2 onion, half moon thin slices
1 tablespoon coconut oil (or olive oil)
2 garlic cloves, diced
1 teaspoon chopped ginger
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup water

Heat the coconut oil in a stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the sliced onions and salt.  Cook for about 3-5 minutes until browned. Move the onions to a dish to set aside.

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Add the garlic, ginger and curry powder to the pot and let it cook for about 1 minute scraping up and bits from the cooked onions.  Add the chopped cabbage and stir, letting the cabbage cook for about 2 minutes.  Return the onions to the stockpot and then add 1 cup of water. Cover and let the mixture come to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook covered for 10 minutes.

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When finished, remove from heat and serve or place in a storage container to enjoy later. It can be enjoyed reheated or cold.

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Abundance Bowl

On April 28, 2014, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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We often take a long drive out to Ojai on Sundays to get out of the city and to experience one of our favorite Farmers’ Markets. There is a great selection of organic fruits and vegetables plus some great cheese vendors, but it’s more about the experience.  An experience of driving through the hills to eventually spend an afternoon enjoying the market and park in the center of town.

Our other stop is a great vegan restaurant called Hip Vegan, of course. Dumb name aside it really is a wonderful place to have lunch. One of our favorite options is choosing from some of the abundance bowls they serve.

What’s an abundance bowl?

It’s basically a bowl full of various vegetables along with some grains or beans and a dressing. I had been wanting to try a version at home since we only get out to Ojai maybe once every couple months. Thanks to Pinterest I found a pretty solid Abundance Bowl recipe.

The Garlic-Ginger Pumpkin Seed Sauce in this recipe from the blog My New Roots is a bit of a different take than what we get in Ojai at Hip Vegan.  However, it’s even a better take. You’ll love the dressing here and it does keep for about 2 weeks.

Enjoy!

Full Recipe: [My New Roots Winter Abundance Bowl]

 

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Vegetable Pearl Couscous

On April 27, 2014, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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This is a dish that can be used to clear out your vegetable drawer.  Any vegetable will do fine in this and it is a great way to use some of the vegetables you just didn’t get to or that you found at the Farmers’ Market but didn’t have  a specific plan for.  Here I used a few items I still had left after making a few other dishes during the week.

I also find that pearl couscous has a great texture and better flavor than traditional durum wheat couscous. Pearl Couscous is also known as Israel Couscous. It has a soft, almost spongy feel. What I like most about it is it’s versatility too. It can be used for soups or eaten with just some fried onions and tomatoes as an excellent side dish.

The recipe here is a variation on one I found on the VegKitchen blog.  You can see the original recipe here: Seven-Vegetable Couscous.

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Vegetable Pearl Couscous
Serves 4

1 1/2 cups pearl couscous cooked using package’s directions
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon turmeric
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon garam masala
2 teaspoons grated ginger
1 red onion, thick chop
1/2 red cabbage, thick chop
1 head of broccoli, chopped
2 zucchini, diced bite-sized
1 medium turnip, diced bite-sized
1 can chickpeas, drained
1/2 cup golden raisins

Cook the couscous according to the product packaging’s directions. I used Bob’s Red Mill Pearl Couscous but there are other options too.

For the vegetables, heat a saute pan on medium high heat with the olive oil. Add the onions and turmeric. Saute for a couple minutes until onions soften.  Add the turnip, broccoli, and zucchini and the rest of the spices.  Cook for about 5-8 minutes until the turnip is firm but a fork can puncture it easily.  Finally add the cabbage, chickpeas, and raisins and cook for another couple minutes. If you need more olive oil feel free to add a tablespoon to coat everything.

Plate the couscous first and add some vegetables on top. Drizzle some olive oil to finish. Enjoy.

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Korean BBQ Tacos using a SousVide Supreme

On May 27, 2013, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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I’m a very lucky person. There are many reasons: a wonderful family, a loving wife, and once a week the Kogi Korean BBQ taco truck makes a stop right behind the building I work. An order of three short rib tacos makes any day better. It makes life better.

Now I love traditional Mexican street tacos, so much so I have written a ton of reviews on a particular kind of taco – the gas station taco. This passion has led me to appreciate what makes a great taco. The perfect taco combines the elements of a slightly oily handmade corn tortilla, perfectly cooked meat, and the right amount of spices with just enough cilantro and chopped onions to compliment, not overpower the meat, then topped with a smooth, spicy hot sauce. That’s the perfect Mexican street taco.

The Korean taco is an entirely different beast.

Fusion cooking is the mixing of various cultures and is something that can go massively wrong or massively right. The Korean BBQ Taco is fusion and Chef Roy who owns Kogi does it massively right.

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Fresh made corn tortillas

If you’re unfamiliar with the Korean BBQ taco, you’re missing out. It’s sweet, spicy and crunchy. The meat is sauced with a good wet marinade that caramelizes the meat complimented by cilantro-onion-lime relish, topped with lightly pickled cabbage and hot sauce. It’s pure fusion. Combining the elements of Korea’s most famous food this decade – Korean BBQ – with Mexico’s most famous dish – tacos.

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A stack of tortillas after they’ve being heated.

I have been meaning to attempt the Korean BBQ taco at home.  Not copying Kogi, but rather making my own version that’s inspired by the Kogi truck.

This recipe is just that. It’s my own creation of the Korean BBQ taco and to make the meat as tender and flavorful as possible I decided I’d try a new style of cooking while I’m at it. I was contacted by SousVide Supreme who wanted to see what I could do using the sous-vide method (translates to “under vacuum”.) This looked like an excellent opportunity to make a tough meat, I used flat iron steak instead of short ribs, into something tender and juicy. Plus how more fusion can you get then a Mexican taco + Korean BBQ + French cooking method.

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SousVide Supreme with vacuum pouch sealer

Sous-vide involves cooking a vacuum sealed bag of meat or vegetables submerged in water at a consistent temperature. The method produces food that is cooked on the outside and inside at the same “doneness” without overcooking, while keeping the food juicy.  The consistent temperature of the water allows you to have the food ready in a large window of time. For example, the flat iron steak I made is ready anytime between 8 to 24 hours great for a long Memorial Day weekend when our family is running around having fun not knowing exactly when we’ll be home for dinner.

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Marinated flat iron steak submerged in SousVide Supreme

We spent the afternoon at Santa Monica Beach enjoying the warm California sun and flying our kites.

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When we came home and removed the flat iron steak from the SousVide Supreme I sliced off a small piece to try it. It was perfect.  It really was juicy and full of flavor. I placed it out on the grill to give it some grill marks and crunch.

Cooked flat iron steak in Korean BBQ marinade

Cooked flat iron steak in Korean BBQ marinade

Look how nicely cooked it was after cooking in the water at 140 degrees for 9 hours.

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A perfect medium

I did make my own tortillas for this recipe, but you don’t have to go that extra step. Just be sure to find some good quality corn tortillas and revitalize them in a saute pan with a little oil.  Heat the oil on medium-high heat and place a tortilla in for 10 seconds and then flip for another 5 seconds remove and place on some paper towels, patting off the excess oil. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Later this month, I’m competing with several other BBQ bloggers at http://www.sousvidesupreme.com/sousvidebbq.htm. Check back after June 25 to see what recipe I decide to enter and send me a vote if you want. As a bonus, each person who casts a vote for their fan favorite will be entered to win a $200 gift certificate to www.sousvidesupreme.com.

DISCLAIMER: I was sent the SousVide Supreme to try as part of a blogger outreach program from the company.  The opinions are my own.

Sous-Vide Korean BBQ Tacos

Prep Time: 20 Mins Cooking Time: 8 Hours Total Time: 8 Hours

Ingredients:

  • 2 lb. flat iron steak

Marinade

  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • 5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sriracha sauce
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice

Pickled Cabbage

  • 1/2 head of cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon lime juice

Cilantro relish

  • 1 bunch cilantro, finely chopped
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • juice from 1 lime

Directions:

  1. Combine the marinade ingredients and whisk together. Place the meat in the marinade and let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. In the morning, remove the flat iron steak and place into a vacuum pouch pour in about 2 tablespoons of the marinade into the vacuum pouch. Seal the steak using a vacuum food sealer.
  2. Fill up a SousVide Supreme with water and place the rack and sealed meat into the cooker. Set the heat to 140 degrees for medium doneness and let it cook for 8 hour or up to 24 hours. After 8 hours the meat is ready, the remaining time is just flex time that will keep the meat at the final cooked heat without over cooking.
  3. Meanwhile before the meat is ready to be removed from the SousVide Supreme, make the pickled cabbage and cilantro relish.
  4. For the cabbage, combine all of the ingredients together in a bowl and cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours for the flavors to combine.
  5. The cilantro relish is made by simply combining the ingredients in a bowl and setting aside. This can be made right before taking the meat out.
  6. When the meat is ready, remove from the water and cut the vacuum pouch open. Remove the flat iron steak and place on a hot grill for a few minutes to give it some char. Remove and slice into small cubes for the taco.
  7. On each tortilla, place some meat followed by the cilantro relish and then the cabbage on top. Pour on some hot sauce too if you desire and serve.
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Mustard, Cabbage and Cannellini Beans with Sausage

On October 9, 2011, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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The kids and my wife will definitely not eat this one. I’m the sole kielbasa fan in this house. In fact, sausage is rarely made since the boys and Stephanie will only eat frankfurters from Burgundy Pasture Beef Ranch.  I’m sure Oscar and Theo will come around, but for now sausage is too spicy for their little taste-buds. As Oscar put it today, “if it’s a little spicy to you daddy, it’s a lot of spicy to us.”

For those of us who enjoy a pot of sausage, cabbage and beans, this recipe makes the perfect afternoon lunch for Sunday football. Just add some beer and you are all set.

Mustard Cabbage and Cannellini Beans with Sausage

1 kielbasa sausage, sliced in half and cut into 4-6 inch pieces
1 medium onion, chopped
1 tsp fennel seeds, slightly crushed
1 tsp ground coriander
2 garlic cloves
1 head of cabbage, thinly sliced
1/2 cup chicken stock
1/4 cup whole grain mustard
1/4 tsp dried thyme
1 can cannellini beans, drained
Salt to taste

Cook sausage in a little olive oil in a pot at medium-high heat. Cook about 4 minutes on each side to lightly brown. Remove from pot.

Add onion to skillet and saute for 5 minutes. Add the fennel seeds, coriander, and garlic and saute for 2 minutes. Add cabbage; cook 6 minutes or until tender. Add broth and mustard; cover and cook for 10 minutes. Stir in thyme, salt and beans cooking for 5 minutes to heat.

Serve with a Newcastle Brown Ale.

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Pork and Cabbage in Milk

On October 4, 2009, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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This is kind of a strange dish. We liked how the cabbage and bacon added a nice flavor to everything without either overpowering the dish, but it wasn’t great. It was good. This is something to add to the mix in the fall or winter months that is hearty and tasty, but not as heavy as a stew or roast.


Pork and Cabbage in milk

Serves 4

2 tablespoons olive oil
4 boneless pork loins (1-inch thick, fat trimmed)
coarse salt and pepper
4 strips bacon, coarsely chopped
1 medium onion, cut into 1/2-inch slices
1/2 head green cabbage, cored an cut into 4 wedges
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups whole milk

1. Preheat ove to 400 and set a large roasting pot over high heat on burner, add oil to pot. Season pork with salt and pepper; brown each side – 3 to 5 minutes. Flip and cook 1 minute more. Transfer to plate.

2. Reduce heat to medium. Add bacon; cook until golden, about 5 minutes stirring often. Add onion; cook until softened, 5 minutes. Add cabbage and cook until light golden, about 6 minutes. Flip and cook until slightly tender, about 3 more minutes. Add flour 1 tablespoon at a time to 2 cups of milk in a bowl, stir each tablespoon with whisk until blended. Add milk and flour mixture to pot and cook until thickened for 4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then return pork loins to pot (with any juices.) Transfer pot to oven and bake until pork is cooked through, about 10 minutes.

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Crock Pot Corned Beef and Cabbage

On March 18, 2009, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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It’s Saint Patrick’s Day so I decided to do the traditional thing and make some corned beef and cabbage. The following recipe is a better version than most, as it leaves the cabbage separate from the main crock pot, giving the cabbage a more independent taste when combined with the corned beef and other vegetables when served.

This year I found an excellent brand of corned beef. Our local Market Square grocer carried a trim corned beef made by a Detroit company from Eastern Market — Wigleys Famous Eastern Market Corned Beef. They have been in business since 1920, first in Ireland and then here in the U.S. Visit Wigleys at either of their Eastern Market locations: 3405 Russell St., Detroit, 48207, 313-833-3030; or 1429 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, 313-567-2857. This was by far the most tender and trim corned beef I’ve ever had. It is really worth seeking out. The whole family was impressed and said it was the best they have ever had too.

Crock Pot Corned Beef and Cabbage
Serves 6

3 carrots, cut in 3 inch pieces
3 red potatoes, cut in 3 inch pieces
2 med. onions, quartered
3 to 4 lb. corned beef brisket
3/4 to 1 1/4 c. water
1 sm. head cabbage, cut in wedges

Put all ingredients, except cabbage wedges, in crock pot in order listed. Cover and cook on low 8 to 10 hours (high 5-6 hours).

Cabbage: To prepare cabbage, cook it separately in 6 quart pot. Remove 2 cups of broth from crock pot during last hour of cooking; pour over cabbage wedges in skillet. Cover and cook slowly for 20 to 30 minutes.

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