Smoked Tri-Tip Roast with Chanterelle Brandy Cream Sauce

This is my now my official submission to theSousVide Supreme BBQ Recipe Challenge! Please visit the link and vote for me before July 7th! Each person who casts a vote for their fan favorite will be entered to win a $200 gift certificate to www.sousvidesupreme.com!

My time with the SousVide Supreme is coming to an end soon.  It’s been an creative addition to the kitchen and there is a lot I’d still like to experiment with as I continue to see how it bests fits into our home cooking routine.  Two of its best qualities are exemplified in this recipe.

  1. It makes cooking a roast easy while maintaining it’s tenderness.
  2. The time span for when it is ready to eat makes it simple and flexible for cooking a great meal after work.

The second reason is one of my favorite things about sous-vide cooking.  In this case, the tri-tip roast can be left in the water bath for 8-24 hours. Think about that.  If the day at work runs a couple hours long like mine did last Thursday, no worries. Come home and remove it from the SousVide Supreme and make a quick cream sauce that takes 5 minutes.  Dinner served (though my mashed potatoes took a good 12 minutes. So not quite that fast.)

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Looks pretty nice too on the counter.

This recipe was also the first time I used my smoker in conjunction with the SousVide Supreme.  I was a bit concerned that only 2 hours in the smoker wouldn’t add that much smoke flavor to the roast.  Fortunately, my concern was unwarranted as the roast had a great smoky flavor that added to the rich mushroom brandy sauce.

Note: I’d recommend any hearty mushrooms for this sauce. Morels would’ve been great too or even portobello. A strong flavor mushroom combined with the smoked meat is a bit odd at first, because its something unusual. Good thing it is a good unusual. 

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Chanterelle mushrooms were a great find at the Farmers’ Market

I believe the secret to keeping the smoke flavor in the meat is to quickly remove it from the smoker and into a vacuum sealed bag.  If you want more of a smoked flavor, you could put the meat in the freezer for a hour or two before placing it in the smoker. This way you can add another 30 or 45 minutes to the cooking time in the smoker. Just be careful not to totally freeze the meat.

Smoked Tri-Tip Roast with Chanterelle Brandy Cream Sauce

Serves 4

2 lb tri-tip roast

Rub

1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Sauce

3/4 cup heavy cream
3 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup Brandy
1/2 cup Chanterelle mushrooms, course chop
1 garlic clove, diced
1 shallot, diced
1 tablespoon fresh italian parsley, finely chopped

The night before mix the ingredients to make the rub and coat the tri-tip roast.  Then cover in dish with cellophane and place in the refrigerator overnight.

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Into the smoker the rubbed tri-tip goes.

Early the next morning prepare your smoker by getting it to a steady 220 degree temperature. Place the tri-tip roast into the smoker and cook it for 2 hours at 220 degrees.  When done, remove it from the smoker and quickly place the roast into a plastic bag. Vacuum seal the roast and submerge into a SousVide Supreme cooker.

Set the SousVide Supreme to 140 degrees and let it cook for anytime between 8-12 hours.

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Time is of essence. Quickly seal after removing from smoker.

Start making the sauce by placing 2 tablespoons of butter into a sauté pan. Add the garlic and shallot and sauté for about 3 minutes to soften on medium-high heat.  Add the Brandy and let it reduce by half.  Then add the Chanterelle mushrooms and sauté for another 2-3 minutes letting the mushrooms soften. Add the heavy cream and salt and pepper.  Let the cream come to a boil then reduce the heat to medium-low and watch to not burn the sauce. It’s best to keep moving the pan to let the flavors blend and to reduce too much boiling of the cream.

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Brandy, mushrooms, cream and butter. One of my favorite combinations.

Once the sauce is ready add the last tablespoon of butter just before serving, remove the tri-tip roast from the SousVide Supreme and remove from the vacuum sealed pack.  Slice the roast against the grain into 1/2 inch slices. Arrange the meat on the plate.

Finally with the sauce add the chopped parsley and 1 tablespoon of butter.  Let the butter melt into the sauce and stir. Serve the sauce with the roast and any sides.


DISCLAIMER: I was sent the SousVide Supreme to try as part of a blogger outreach program from the company.  The opinions are my own.

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Texas Brisket for #SundaySupper

On May 18, 2013, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
60

 

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When I read this week’s SundaySupper theme was “Low & Slow” I knew exactly what I wanted to make and where I would get inspiration from.  As regular readers of my blog will know, this site has been taken over by a lot of slow cooking – cooking in a smoker to be exact. After returning from South by Southwest in Austin last March, I had a constant craving for barbecue. Smoked barbecue was constantly on my mind since I had my first and so far only taste of the most amazing brisket I’ve had in my life at Franklin Barbecue.

A coworker and I went to Franklin’s pretty late which was quite risky since the line is usually 3 hours and when they run out that’s it. No more and that time today was right around 1:15pm when we showed up and got behind a few people waiting outside the door.  About three minutes after getting in line someone from the restaurant comes out to put a “sold out today” sign on the door telling us they’re out, but they may have some scraps.

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At this point, we are good with scraps.  We waited in line with about 6 other people and when we finally made it to the counter there was one last perfectly cooked brisket just for us. No scraps!  Instead we had some amazing brisket that day.

I still can’t get that meal out of my mind (or is it taste-buds?)  It was an unforgetable food experience similar to the first time I went to Mario Batali’s Babbo Restaurant in New York City back in the early 2000’s. That meal change my perspective on Italian food forever. Franklin Barbecue changed my perspective on Southern barbecue forever and I knew I had to find a way to make that experience come home, just like how I learned to cook a few dishes like Batali’s Mint Love Letters ravioli.

For the next month I research smokers. Wood smokers. Ceramic smokers. Electric smokers. All kinds of options and read a ton of articles and message boards talking about perfect brisket and what it takes to get that great dark, Texas crunch and smoked flavor I had in Austin.

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When it came down to a final decision between a CookShack electric smoker and a ceramic Big Green Egg smoker, I went electric.  Now I knew this sacrificed me ever fully replicating Franklin Barbecue, but I knew I could get close. Heck I’d probably only just get close and that would still be pretty amazing.

So here I am on my second attempt at brisket in my CookShack smoker.  The first attempt was great, but it was a little too complex in the steps and came out a little too dry.  Plus last time I made a rookie mistake when buying the meat and bought what’s called a “flat” brisket.  What you really want is a “point” brisket. The point is that extra flap of the beef shoulder that most butchers cut-off from the brisket. Fortunately, I’ve found a great local butcher who specializes in grass-fed beef and I called them last Tuesday, literally when the cow arrives, and asked for a point brisket that ended up being a little over 9 pounds.

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I also found Aaron Franklin, the owner of Franklin Barbecue, in some YouTube videos talking about how he cooks brisket.

Here it is my second attempt. It was definitely an improvement, but I still have some work.  Mostly I left too much fat on.  Be sure to cut most of the fat off and watch Aaron’s video for some tips. I didn’t completely follow the instructions which I will next time. Basically, you want to remove most of the fat and keep some. Again, watch the video to learn more.

Don’t forget to check out the fabulous line up of recipes for today’s Low and Slow #SundaySupper

Low & Slow Breads & Starters:

Low & Slow Mains:

Low & Slow Sides:

Low & Slow Desserts:

Wine Pairing Recommendations for Low & Slow Food from ENOFYLZ Wine Blog

Don’t forget to join the #SundaySupper chat on Twitter Sunday to discuss cooking low and slow! We’ll tweet throughout the day and share our delicious recipes. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm EST. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag, and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more delicious recipes and food photos.

Check out the Food & Wine Conference sponsored by Sunday Supper! Being held July 19th – 21st in beautiful, sunny Orlando, FL. It’s a must for food bloggers. Find out more here ? Food & Wine Conference

 

Texas Brisket

Prep Time: 15 Mins Cooking Time: 11 Hours Total Time: 11 Hours 15 Mins

Ingredients:

  • 9-10 lb point brisket
  • 1/2 cup ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup sea salt
  • 1/8 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground chipotle pepper

Directions:

  1. Trim the brisket removing most of the fat, but keeping some about a 1/4″ thick.
  2. Mix the rub ingredients together in a small bowl or shaker. Coat the brisket and let it refrigerate overnight.
  3. Heat smoker to 225 degrees. Place brisket in smoker.
  4. About 2 hours spray quickly with apple juice in a spray bottle.
  5. Remove brisket in 4 hours and wrap in butcher paper or aluminum foil. Spray apple juice and cover.
  6. Remove foil in last hour of cooking when meat temperature reaches 185 degrees. Spray with apple juice and place back in smoker until meat reaches 195 degree internal temperature.
  7. Serve.
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Pulled Pork

On April 21, 2013, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
3

With a new toy in the backyard, it’s no surprise I’ve done back to back weeks of BBQ. This weekend I put the smoker to work doing some Pulled Pork.  Friday after I work I made a trip to west Los Angeles to Lindy & Grundy and picked up a beautiful 6 1/2 lb bone-in pork butt.  Here it is the day before after I applied the rub.

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We were having neighbors over so it was the first time I would have guests to try what came out of the smoker. My biggest worry was having it ready on time. Concerned I may not have enough time even though I placed the meat in the cooker at 6:30am with guests coming at 6pm, I decided to up the temperature from 225 degrees to 250 for the full cooking time.

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The pork did come out with a more darker crust than I’d expect with a slower cooking time, but it wasn’t burnt. There was a pretty good crunch and the hotter temperature proved a good solution as the internal temperature of the pork came to 195 degrees after 11 hours which gave me time to pull the pork before guests arrived. Here is how it looked falling off the bone after I pulled it out of the smoker.

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I pulled the pork and lined a pan and covered it with foil then placed it back into the smoker for when we were all ready to eat. The end product was full of smoky flavor, had some great pieces of “bark” and was fairly moist though I could’ve taken it out about a hour or half hour earlier when the internal temperature hit 190 degrees for a more moist meat.  The pulled pork was served with two homemade barbeque sauces: Mustard and Sweet sauces.

Here is the end result.

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Pulled Pork

Prep Time: 15 Mins Cooking Time: 11 Hours Total Time: 11 Hours 15 Mins

Ingredients:

  • 6 1/2 lb bone-in pork butt
  • Rub:
  • 3/4 cup Hot Smoked Paprika
  • 1/4 cup Black Pepper
  • 1/4 cup Salt
  • 1/4 cup Dark Brown Sugar
  • 2 tablespoons Garlic Powder
  • 2 tablespoons Onion Powder

Directions:

  1. Rub pork the night before or for 8 hours before putting in the smoker.
  2. Heat smoker to a 250 degree temperature maintaining a consistent temperature for 11-12 hours. Remove from smoker when internal temperature of meat hits 190 degrees.
  3. Remove and pull the pork. Serve with your favorite sauce or sauces.
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Smoker “Flat” Brisket

On April 14, 2013, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
13

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Since leaving Austin, Texas last month after one of the better South By Southwest years, I had a craving for BBQ – smoked BBQ to be exact. See I went on a Pilgrimage to a place that had been recommended to me for year: Franklin BBQ. For some dumb reason, I went to Austin four times in my life and it took the fourth time for me to get to Franklin.  Fortunately, I did have another trip to Texas – this time Dallas – in late March and made some time to get some brisket at Lockhart Smokehouse. So I was finding my outlets for great BBQ, but traveling to Texas every time wasn’t feasible so I began a search for a home smoker.

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Long story short.  I settled on two final choices: Big Green Egg and Cookshack. Both are high-quality home smokers.  What basically led me to the Cookshack is that I wanted something that didn’t take as much tending. You just set the temperature and go about your day.  Where lump charcoal and wood smoker/grills require a bit more babysitting something I just don’t have time for. So I gave up some flexibility and I’m sure some taste too and went with an electric Cookshack smoker.

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After my first weekend, I’m glad I went with Cookshack.  The smoker is easy to maneuver around the deck which was important as my wife was none too happy with smoke coming into the home with the first couple locations I put the smoker.  A Big Green Egg weighs over 100 pounds (I was looking at the medium size.) I also like how little wood is needed, only 2 ounces for this brisket. Nothing more.

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Which brings me to my first trial in the new smoker. I made a classic newbie error a couple weeks earlier when buying some grass-fed brisket at the local Farmers’ Market. I bought what is known as a flat; instead, of the more ideal “point” brisket. Basically, a point brisket has a flap of fat that lays on top of the meat and provides a lot more flavor and that much desired crust. Good news is a flat isn’t a bad choice either and I found a recipe online that tried to replicate that nice Texas crust.  Thanks to the Grill Grrrl blog, I found a recipe that did a great job of making a flavorful flat brisket; even though, the recipe calls for a point. Though the recipe walkthrough obviously uses a flat brisket so I figured I’d be okay with a flat and was.

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Note: For the BBQ sauce, I went with a simple recipe I found on FoodNetwork and have now added this recipe to my shortlist of great BBQ sauce. I did a couple minor modifications to it. Substituted dry mustard with 1 tablespoon of dijon mustard, 1/4 teaspoon of garlic powder, and added 1 tablespoon of molasses. Full recipe here: Neely’s BBQ Sauce.

Smoker “Flat” Brisket

Prep Time: 30 Mins Cooking Time: 10 Hours

Ingredients:

  • Ingredients:
  • 4 lb Brisket “flat”
  • 1 part hickory, 1 parts apple wood
  • Rub:
  • 2 tbsp garlic salt
  • 2 tbsp fresh ground pepper
  • 2 tbsp chile powder
  • 1 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp smoked paprika
  • Wrap Sauce:
  • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp chopped shallots
  • 2 tbsp apple juice
  • Glaze:
  • 3/4 cup of your favorite BBQ sauce
  • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

Directions:

  1. Combine the rub ingredients and generously “rub” into the meat. Cover and refrigerate over night.
  2. Prepare the smoker to 225 degrees. I’m using a Cookshack Smokette Elite. You’ll need to adjust times for your smoker.
  3. Place the brisket on the smoker and let it smoke for 6-7 hours or until the internal temp reaches 170 degrees. Next, you are going to do the “Texas Crutch”- or wrap it in foil. Roll out a bunch of foil and double it up so that you can fold the brisket into a foil “packet.” Remove the brisket, put it on the foil and pour on the wrap liquid. Seal up the foil packet and put it back on the grill. Let the brisket steam in the packet for another 2 hours or until the internal temp is 190 degrees.
  4. Remove the foil from the brisket and glaze then place the meat back in the smoker and let it smoke for another 45 minutes to a hour to absorb the sauce and get a nice glaze.
  5. Once you pull the brisket off, “tent” it in foil for 30 minutes. Slice against the grain in 1/4” slices.
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