Jägerschnitzel for #SundaySupper

On January 19, 2013, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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This week’s Sunday Supper theme is Retro Recipes.  I was reminded a couple weeks ago about one of my favorite restaurants when I made some German Lentil Soup from Portland Oregon’s Der Rheinlander. The soup was great, but it was missing something. Something I loved to eat as a child – Jägerschnitzel.  It was one of the few ways I would eat mushrooms, the other being on supreme pizza.

Jägerschnitzel is basically a bacon mushroom cream sauce on a wiener-schnitzel  I had the recipe for Der Rheinlander’s basic schnitzel.  All I needed was some inspiration for a mushroom cream sauce.  I found a few on the web, but had an amazing mushroom cream sauce I’ve made many times before. Add some bacon and onions and I would be whisked back to the early 1980s eating a Jägerschnitzel in Portland.

I may have the oldest of the retro recipes in this week’s Sunday Supper event.  Both the Austrians and Italians claim to have invented the wiener-schnitzel. The Italians claim the dish was made in 1134 at a banquet for the canon of Milan’s St. Ambrogio Cathedral.

Now that’s retro.

Jägerschnitzel
Serves 4

4 veal scallopini, pounded thin
2 whole eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon milk
1 lemon, juice
1 1/2 cups bread crumbs
1/4 cup canola oil
2 tablespoons butter
flour, to coat
salt and pepper to taste
1 lemon cut into wedges

Mushroom Cream Sauce
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 cup cremini mushrooms, diced and quartered
1 tablespoon cream sherry
1 slice bacon, small diced
1/2 onion, diced
1 shallot, diced
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoons butter
small bunch parsley

For the schnitzel, wrap veal cutlets in cellophane and pound with a mallet. Heat a saute pan on medium-high heat with oil and butter.

Rub some lemon juice over the veal and then dredge the veal in flour.  A simple way to do this is to use a gallon ziplock bag and place about a 1/2 cup flour in the bag and shake the bag to coat the veal.  Remove veal from bag and now with the egg and milk mixed together in small bowl, coat the flour dredged veal in the egg and shake so it is not dripping egg and coat with bread crumbs.

Add the bread crumb coated veal to the saute pan and cook on each side until the bread crumbs are nicely browned, not burned, about 3-4 minutes each side.  Remove the cooked veal from the saute pan and place on a plate.

Now to make the sauce, add the bacon and cook for about 2-3 minutes.  Add the mushrooms, onions, shallot, and thyme and cook for about 2 minutes then deglaze the pan with the cream sherry. Once the sherry has cooked off, about 1 minute, add the heavy cream and butter. Add the parsley and reduce heat to a simmer and place the cooked breaded veal back in the pan.

After letting flavors combine for a couple minutes, serve with spätzle and some vegetables.

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Join us Around the Family Table this Sunday at 7pm Eastern Time and share your favorite Retro Food Memory with us!

Sunday Supper Retro Appetizers:
Sunday Supper Retro Salads:
Sunday Supper Retro Breads and Sandwiches:
SundaySupper Main Dishes:
Sunday Supper Retro Sides and Veggies:
Sunday Supper Retro Desserts and Cocktails:

Sunday Supper MovementI’d love to hear about some of your favorite Retro Recipes!  Feel free to leave links and/or recipes in the comments.  Also, feel free to join us for our live twitter chat tonight at 7pm (Eastern) using the#SundaySupper hashtag, and check out the Sunday Supper board on Pinterest.

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Pork Tenderloin with Calvados Cream Sauce

On September 23, 2012, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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This week’s #SundaySupper is all about apples as we celebrate the beginning of Fall with an Autumn Apple Party. Immersing ourselves into the apple theme we decided to spend Saturday at a couple apple orchards near San Bernadino about a hour and 20 minutes east of Pasadena.  Our first stop was Snow-Line Orchard where the boys watched donuts being made and tried about 15 different types of apples at the sampling table.

We stopped there to do u-pick raspberries since they didn’t do u-pick apples.  Sadly, by 1pm they had ran out of raspberries to pick so we enjoyed some donuts and drove down the road to Riley’s Los Rios Ranch. Riley’s was a lot of fun. The boys loved roaming around the rows of apple trees finding all kinds of varieties to pick.  We mostly ended up with some beautiful red delicious and granny smiths.

We brought home 5 pounds of apples, a pint of apple cider, and homemade caramel dip. Yes it’s a good weekend.

After a fun afternoon of apple picking, it was time to start cooking. I stopped by a store for some Calvados (Apple Brandy) and picked up an organic pork tenderloin at the market. I had some collard greens, sweet potato, and bunch of freshly picked apples to begin the night’s feast.

I paired this dish with a couple sides.  The first was some sauted collard greens.  Just chop some greens and slice half of an onion into thin half-moon.  Add some olive oil to a saute pan cooking the onions for a couple minutes then adding the greens and cooking them down for about 5-8 minutes. Toss a few times during cooking to mix the onions and greens together. You’re done.

For the second side, I chopped up two sweet potatoes and one apple into small cubes.  Tossed them with a handful of raisins, olive oil and salt and pepper .  Bake this in an oven proof casserole dish at 450 degrees for 30 minutes while you make the main the course.

 

Pork Tenderloin with Calvados Cream Sauce
Serves 4

1 1/2 lbs pork tenderloin, cut into 1″ “steaks”
1 apple, thinly sliced
1 shallot, finely diced
2-3 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/4 cup Calvados (apple brandy)
1/2 cup heavy cream
salt and pepper

Heat olive oil and 1 tablespoon of butter in medium heat pan. Add the shallots and cook for two minutes.  While cooking pound the pork tenderloin “steaks” using a meat tenderizer, salt and pepper the pork and add to the pan.

Cook about 3 minutes on each side where the sides of the pork brown just a bit.  Don’t crowd the pan and set aside some of the tenderloin in a bowl.

With some pork tenderloins in the pan, add the apple brandy to the pan and if you feel daring ignite the brandy with a match after it heats in the pan for a second.  The flames will surge so be careful. Let it cook for a moment with the flames then carefully cover the pan to put out the flames. Cook the brandy on medium-high heat letting it reduce by half.

Once the brandy is reduced by half add the heavy cream and cut up apples.  Let this cook stirring together bring it to a boil then reduce the heat and let it cook for about 3 minutes to let the sauce thicken.

Serve the pork with the sauce and sides.


For more Sunday Supper Autumn Apple recipes checkout the following:

Soups, Salads, Starters and Breads

Main Meals

Sides

Desserts

Beverages

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Chanterelle Mushroom Cream Linguini

On July 16, 2012, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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I had a great early afternoon at the Studio City Farmer’s Market today.  Our family had stopped here about a year ago when we were in town visiting family and taking the boys to Disneyland on that trip for their 5th Birthday.  It was one of the things I was most excited about when I thought about living again in Los Angeles.

The Studio City Farmers’ Market is full of wonderful vendors with everything from the usual bounties of fresh fruits and vegetables, many of them organic and all of them locally farmed.  Plus there are some standout prepared food vendors including a guy who makes the best meat and vegetable arabic pies that are a bargain at 6 for $5.  I also found an Indian family selling their homemade sauces and bought the masala to try later with some locally raised chicken also bought at the market.

This is the second meal I’m cooking at the Extended Stay America where I now have a nicely stocked fridge.  The pasta dish was a back up decision as I was going to make a lentil vegetarian meal tonight until I realized I need some measuring cups.  Tomorrow off to the market for some measuring cups and spoons.

For tonight’s dinner, I used some from fresh linguini and chanterelle mushrooms I picked up. A stop at the Glendale Whole Foods rounded up a couple additional things needed for this meal.

Chanterelle Mushroom Cream Linguini
Serves 2

1/2 lb fresh linguini
2 oz fresh Chanterelle mushrooms, rough chop
1 cup heavy cream
3 springs of fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon of dried
1/2 small onion, finely diced
1 garlic clove, finely diced
olive oil

Boil water for the pasta. While water is waiting to boil, add a little bit of olive oil to a sauté pan and cook the onion and garlic for about 3 minutes on medium-high until lightly brown.  Add the Chanterelles and the thyme and cook for another 2 minutes.

Add the pasta to the boiling water and reduce heat to medium-high. Let the fresh pasta cook for 3 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Pour the heavy cream into the sauté pan and let it boil a little bit and then reduce heat to low to medium-low stirring when it begins to bubble. You want to let it thicken but not burn over boil.  The sauce should thicken in about 2-3 minutes.

Top with your favorite grated parmesan reggiano cheese

 

Mario Batali’s Mint Love Letters

On April 21, 2012, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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If you are ever in New York City, I highly recommend Babbo.  It’s an Italian restaurant from celebrity chef Mario Batali.  It’s amazing.  I say Mario is a “celebrity chef” but he is the real deal and is by far my favorite chef. His approach to Italian food that used to be featured in his Food TV Network show Molto Mario, back when Food TV had good shows instead of all of this competitive reality crap.

My favorite two dishes of Babbo’s are the oxtail gnocchi and mint love letters.  I’ve tried making both but have been more successful with my attempts at the latter than the former.  Nothing I’ve made is equal or better to what I’ve had a Babbo’s.  That said this is a very impressive dish and it is definitely worth your time and effort, especially considering how Babbo’s isn’t around the corner from my home.

This dish took about a hour and half to make, so do it on a weekend, not after work.

First thing you’ll want to do is make the Basic Red Sauce. I did this the day before.. The recipe is simple and uses these few ingredients.

First start with making your pasta dough, I use a basic recipe that requires 30 minutes after the dough is made making sure it is not sticky and wrap it in plastic. Let it sit and make your filling.

For the Mint Love Letters, ie the Ravioli, you’ll want to start with the filling.  Blend peas, mint, Parmigiano Reggiano, heavy cream and salt and pepper using a food processor. I’d advise adding the heavy cream separately until you develop a thick paste that will hold as the filling in the pasta sheets.

Now work with your pasta creating two sheets of similar size and shape that you’ll use to create about 3 to 4 raviolis.  I run the pasta through the rollers starting at thickness 1 working down to thickness 5. You can go as low as 6, but you will have some rip. I recommend thinning the sheets to size 5 thickness.

Prepare each ravioli using two thin sheets of pasta dough and small dollop of filing making sure it’s not too large as you don’t want it bursting later when boiling.

Continue making your raviolis and dust with flour so they will not stick to each other. Also start heating your water to bring to a boil, lightly salt.

Start your sauce by lightly browning your spicy ground lamb. If you do not like lamb, use ground beef and add a 1 teaspoon of each of basil and oregano and add a few flakes of dried red pepper.

Add the pasta to the boiling water and cook for about 5 minutes, being careful not to overcook or undercook.

While the ravioli is boiling and the meat is lightly browned, add the red sauce and about 5 chiffon leaves of fresh mint before serving. Cook the red sauce and meat for about 3 minutes.

Add several raviolis to each plate and complete with the meat sauce.  Sprinkle with Parmigiano Reggiano. Serve.


Recipes:

Basic Red Sauce

Mint Love Letters with Spicy Lamb Sausage 

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Mushroom Pasta Divine

On April 1, 2012, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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Since moving from Michigan, I have definitely missed the bounty of fresh pasta I could buy at Ventimiglia Italian Market. Tired of the occasional dry pasta I decided it was time to take action and by action I mean using some of my American Express member reward points to do some Williams Sonoma shopping.

A well-reviewed pasta maker kept coming up high in my research. The KitchenAid Pasta Press attachment looked like a great solution so I went ahead and ordered one. Today I finally had some time to use it.

Making pasta is quite simple and takes all of about 5 minutes. To make enough pasta for four people here is how I made some quick pasta dough.

I made some rigatoni noodles which was super easy and boiled a pot of water with a little bit of salt. Added the pasta and cooked it for 3 minutes.

This time I went with a mushroom cream pasta recipe I found on Pinterest at the Sweet Paul blog. It turned out great and was a wonderful debut breaking in for my new pasta shape maker.

Pasta Dough
Serves 4

1 1/4 cup flour
1/2 cup semolina flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1/2 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup water

Mix first three ingredients in stand mixer. In a sparate bowl, mix the last three ingredients.  Slowly add the liquid ingredients to the dry with the KitchenAid mixer on a low speed. Let it combine. If a ball is not forming, add a little olive oil.  It should combine.

Now remove from mixer. If it is not sticky, then wrap in plastic wrap and let it sit for 20 minutes.  It’s ready then to use.

If it is sticky, just kneed with a little bit of flour on a cutting board, then wrap in plastic and let it sit for 20 minutes. Use after that.

Full Recipe: Mushroom Pasta Divine.

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Grilled Steak with Onion Bleu Cheese Sauce

On February 26, 2012, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
1

While grilling a steak with just salt and pepper can be enjoyable, a cheese based sauce can add so much to the meal.  This particular sauce will make you think you are eating at a 5-star restaurant. It is so overtly decadent, yet incredibly simple to make.

A sauce with grilled onions, butter, heavy cream and bleu cheese combines to add so much richness to a delicious steak.

I can’t recommend this recipe enough. Try it. You will impress yourself.

Click here for the full recipe:  Grilled Ribeye Steak with Onion-Bleu Cheese Sauce

 

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My favorite way to cook filet mignon at home is to get a bit adventerous and light some cognac on fire, watch my wife’s head nod in disgust and listen to my kids say “daddy is burning the kitchen.”  Oh well, that’s what home insurance is for, right?  If you are going to catch your home on fire, and let’s hope I never do, doing it by cooking Steak Diane is a decadent way to do it.

Fortunately, tonight we all survived.

I downloaded the Food & Wine iPad application a few months back and as part of the download received a free issue (additional issues are $1.99 – a deal compared to newsstand prices.)  In the free issue is a recipe from Emeril Lagasse for his version of Steak Diane.  I decided to give it a try.

The recipe is fairly easy to make and takes about 15 minutes which makes it an excellent gourmet choice for a work night.  I accompanied it with some mashed red potatoes and… can yellow corn. Yes from a can… This is one of the rare moments I use canned vegetables, but I had picked up some canned corn from Trader Joe’s on a recent visit to St Louis (Dallas is supposedly getting them soon.)  The canned corn from Trader Joe’s is like no other I’ve had. It is sweet and tastes nothing like other canned vegetables.  Trust me.

Back to the Steak Diane.

This recipe was good though it lacked the richness of another version I make. It doesn’t mean this recipe is bad, in fact it’s quite good and with the addition of a veal demi glace, I used More Than Gourmet’s version at $3.99 a 1.5 oz size from Whole Foods, it made a flavorful, complex sauce.  The sauce is the star here, but using great cuts of meat and quality mushrooms matter too.

I’m just always suspicious of celebrity chef recipes in magazines or on cooking shows. I highly doubt they give their real recipe. Instead what we get is a slightly modified version that lacks the depth of the chef’s true approach to the dish.  So here is Emeril’s magazine published take on Steak Diane.  It is worth your time and I’m sure you’ll enjoy it. We sure did, especially minus any kitchen fire.

Full recipe: Food & Wine Steak Diane Recipe