Steak Diane

On October 18, 2015, in Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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Steak Diane is one of my favorite stop top steak dishes. I love it so much I have another recipe on the website I did back in 2011 (check it out here.) This version doesn’t use cream, but it does use a lot of butter.  You can also remove the mushrooms in this version, but I had some beautiful chanterelle mushrooms I found at the Farmers’ Market.

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I was in downtown Los Angeles last Friday and made a stop at Grand Central Market to pick up some meat at Belcampo.  They had some petite top sirloin medallions that looked perfect.  I bought four to make this dish.  I often will use filet mignon, but these organic grass-fed top sirloin medallions add a richer flavor.

Steak Diane
Serves 2

4 petite top sirloin medallions, about 1 pound
5 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup Brandy
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce
1 shallot, minced
2 ounces chanterelle mushrooms, chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt & pepper

Add 2 tablespoons and the olive oil to a saute pan on high heat.  When it begins to bubble, add the salt and peppered steaks being cautious to not crowd the pan.

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Cook for five minutes on each side so there is a light browning.  Once both sides are cooked, place steaks on a plate covered with foil to keep warm.

Add the shallot and mushrooms to the pan and scrape up any browned bits.  Add the Brandy and light the pan on fire being careful of a high flame.  Add the lemon juice and worcestershire sauce and cook to combine for a minute.  Add the remaining butter to the pan and return the steaks.  Let it heat for another minute or two and then plate.

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Jägerschnitzel for #SundaySupper

On January 19, 2013, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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This week’s Sunday Supper theme is Retro Recipes.  I was reminded a couple weeks ago about one of my favorite restaurants when I made some German Lentil Soup from Portland Oregon’s Der Rheinlander. The soup was great, but it was missing something. Something I loved to eat as a child – Jägerschnitzel.  It was one of the few ways I would eat mushrooms, the other being on supreme pizza.

Jägerschnitzel is basically a bacon mushroom cream sauce on a wiener-schnitzel  I had the recipe for Der Rheinlander’s basic schnitzel.  All I needed was some inspiration for a mushroom cream sauce.  I found a few on the web, but had an amazing mushroom cream sauce I’ve made many times before. Add some bacon and onions and I would be whisked back to the early 1980s eating a Jägerschnitzel in Portland.

I may have the oldest of the retro recipes in this week’s Sunday Supper event.  Both the Austrians and Italians claim to have invented the wiener-schnitzel. The Italians claim the dish was made in 1134 at a banquet for the canon of Milan’s St. Ambrogio Cathedral.

Now that’s retro.

Jägerschnitzel
Serves 4

4 veal scallopini, pounded thin
2 whole eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon milk
1 lemon, juice
1 1/2 cups bread crumbs
1/4 cup canola oil
2 tablespoons butter
flour, to coat
salt and pepper to taste
1 lemon cut into wedges

Mushroom Cream Sauce
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 cup cremini mushrooms, diced and quartered
1 tablespoon cream sherry
1 slice bacon, small diced
1/2 onion, diced
1 shallot, diced
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoons butter
small bunch parsley

For the schnitzel, wrap veal cutlets in cellophane and pound with a mallet. Heat a saute pan on medium-high heat with oil and butter.

Rub some lemon juice over the veal and then dredge the veal in flour.  A simple way to do this is to use a gallon ziplock bag and place about a 1/2 cup flour in the bag and shake the bag to coat the veal.  Remove veal from bag and now with the egg and milk mixed together in small bowl, coat the flour dredged veal in the egg and shake so it is not dripping egg and coat with bread crumbs.

Add the bread crumb coated veal to the saute pan and cook on each side until the bread crumbs are nicely browned, not burned, about 3-4 minutes each side.  Remove the cooked veal from the saute pan and place on a plate.

Now to make the sauce, add the bacon and cook for about 2-3 minutes.  Add the mushrooms, onions, shallot, and thyme and cook for about 2 minutes then deglaze the pan with the cream sherry. Once the sherry has cooked off, about 1 minute, add the heavy cream and butter. Add the parsley and reduce heat to a simmer and place the cooked breaded veal back in the pan.

After letting flavors combine for a couple minutes, serve with spätzle and some vegetables.

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Join us Around the Family Table this Sunday at 7pm Eastern Time and share your favorite Retro Food Memory with us!

Sunday Supper Retro Appetizers:
Sunday Supper Retro Salads:
Sunday Supper Retro Breads and Sandwiches:
SundaySupper Main Dishes:
Sunday Supper Retro Sides and Veggies:
Sunday Supper Retro Desserts and Cocktails:

Sunday Supper MovementI’d love to hear about some of your favorite Retro Recipes!  Feel free to leave links and/or recipes in the comments.  Also, feel free to join us for our live twitter chat tonight at 7pm (Eastern) using the#SundaySupper hashtag, and check out the Sunday Supper board on Pinterest.

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Chicken in Wine & Dijon Reduction

On July 28, 2012, in Featured, Recipes, by Chris Baccus
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I’ve been hotel living now for over two weeks and this recipe is my most adventurous to date. It also presented me with a bit of a dilemma in the middle of cooking when I suddenly realized I didn’t have a wine bottle opener. Fortunately, the hotel provided serrated knife which I then used to not pop the cork, but rather to plunge the cork into the bottle.  Oh well, I did get the cup of wine I needed plus enjoyed a nice Riesling with my meal.

I have also found that my $6 purchase of Ziploc plastic containers was a brilliant decision.  They work well as mixing bowls or in this case when I needed a small bowl to hold some dijon mustard I needed to “brush” on the chicken pieces.  Brush is sort of what I did, but with no brush I improvised using a the back of a spoon to spread the mustard over the chicken pieces.

This was the first time I used the Extend Stay’s pan since it had sides that worked well for a liquid reduction instead of using my sauté pan or 4 quart pot.

A little about the ingredients…

I bought some pasture raised chicken from the Studio City Farmers’ Market a couple weeks back at the Dey Dey’s Best Ever Chicken stand. They sell half chickens which is a good choice for this recipe, since there is not a lot of room in the cooking pan.  Cooking times are a bit longer at the hotel with an electric stove top and the thin pan, but the results are great as you can see in the photo with the browned skin and meat falling off the bone.

In the end, this was a great success that didn’t really take any special tools other than a wine bottle opener.  My spoon “brushing” method worked well too.

Chicken in Wine & Dijon Reduction
Serves 2

1/2 whole chicken, bone-in split
1 cup white wine
1/2 cup chicken stock
3 shallots, finely diced
1/3 cup dijon mustard
2 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt & pepper to taste

If your breast is thick be sure to add 3 or 4 slices with a knife into the thickest area to help reduce cooking time. Brush the chicken pieces with the dijon mustard. Heat olive oil in pan at medium-high heat adding chicken pieces when hot.  Cook each side for about 15 minutes turning often being careful not to burn.  When flipping the chicken brush some more dijon mustard on to coat fully before turning. Meanwhile dice the shallots.

Remove the chicken pieces from the pan and add the shallots cooking for 1 minute then deglazing the pan with the wine.  Add the chicken stock and return the chicken to the pan.  Let this cook for about 20 minutes on medium heat letting the liquid reduce by half.  Turn the chicken throughout to coat the sauce over the chicken pieces.

Finally remove the chicken from the pan and finish the sauce by adding the butter and some salt and pepper to taste. Pour sauce over chicken and serve with a side dish or two.