Vegan Superfood Bowl for #SundaySupper

Bowls are a great way to enjoy vegan cooking. They can include anything.  If you have some vegetables leftover from the prior weekend’s Farmer’s Market finds, a bowl is a fantastic way to use your remaining vegetables.  They’re also easy to travel with whether that includes a meal for lunch at work, a day at the beach, or to bring along for long road trip so you can avoid fast food.  Packing a vegan bowl is easy and simple.

This week I wanted to experiment a bit with dressing.  I also wanted to incorporate something known as superfood.

So what are superfoods?

I wondered that too and did a little research to learn more.

In it’s simplest form a superfood is basically any food that is good for your health.  Well that seems pretty broad and inline with most of what I eat. There must be more to it than that, right?  There is more. Foods that are dense in nutritional content are considered superfoods. Examples include ingredients like hemp seeds, chia seeds, seaweed, and many other foods are rich in nutrients in a compact size.

There is no agreed upon definition when it comes to superfoods. That issue has been a key criticism from many who are quick to attack the term superfood as simply a marketing term, chosen be a few savvy companies who use the term to sell products using a small amount of a superfood as a way into questionably better health.

I’m not a nutritionist nor do I pretend to be one like The Food Babe.  I honestly don’t really care about the use of superfoods as a nutritional edge.  The reality is most of the superfood products use so little of the superfood ingredients that the benefit is likely very small, if there is any real benefit at all.  Even this recipe uses only a small of amount of superfoods like maca powder and hemp seeds.

What I do know is that the recipe here is good for you. It uses only real foods and is loaded with fresh, unprocessed, organic ingredients.  You really can’t go wrong with this dish.  Is it super?  Maybe.  I know it is super in taste and that’s what is most important to me and my family.

Vegan SuperFood Bowl
Server 4

2 cups dried farro
8 cups water
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons olive oil

4 red beets, 1-inch diced cubes
1 purple bell pepper, cut into strips
2 japanese sweet potatoes, 1-inch diced cubes
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
1 bunch kale, rough chop
3 carrots, peeled and grated into long strips

For dressing

¼ cup almond butter
1/3 cup water
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon maca powder
1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon hemp seeds
2 tablespoons olive oil

Preheat oven at 375 degrees.

Bring water to a boil and add dried farro and salt. Cover and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 20-25 minutes until the liquid has been absorbed by the farro. Remove from heat and fluff with a fork while adding olive oil.

Meanwhile, place the beat, jicama, and bell pepper on a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Drizzle olive oil and add salt and pepper. Place in preheated oven and cook for 20 minutes.   Remove from oven and set aside. Should be ready about the same time as the farro.

Make the dressing by placing all ingredients, except the water, into a VitaMix or blender and blend. Add half the water and blend. Continue to blend and check consistency then add more water as necessary. It should not be watery or paste-like. You want a smooth and creamy dressing.

Place a generous spoonful of cooked farro in each serving bowl. Add some chopped kale and carrots to each bowl. Then divide the roasted vegetables between bowls and keep ingredients separated. Drizzle the dressing in each bowl then serve with some rustic bread and butter.

Enjoy!

#SundaySupper Beer-Braised Beef

Here in California with temperatures falling into the upper 70s it is getting that time of year for a hearty stew or soup.

Alright, so it doesn’t feel like the time of year for a stew. Fortunately, it doesn’t really matter what the temperature is outside. I always enjoy a rich, chunky stew.  The melding of flavors is always a joy and while it used to fit better with the cold air of Michigan winter in November back when our family lived there, so what. Even if we spent this afternoon having ice cream at Sprinkles in Beverly Hills and enjoying some Neapolitan pizza at 800 Degrees in Westwood, it was great ending the day with some beer-braised beef.

This simple recipe is a Belgium response to France’s Beef Bourguignon.

Beer-Braised Beef
Serves 4

2 large onions, rough chop
3 lbs stew beef
1/2 cup flour
4 bacon slices, diced
2 tablespoons oil
1 bottle of beer, brown-ale works best
1 cup beef broth
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
salt and pepper, to taste

Preheat oven at 325 degrees.

Mix stew beef, salt, pepper and flour in a plastic bag to coat the meat.  Heat the oil in a dutch oven on the stove at medium-high heat.  Add the beef without crowding. Cook and turn to brown sides and remove to a plate while adding more uncooked beef remembering not to crowd the pot.

Once all of the beef is brown, add the bacon to the pot and cook making sure not to burn, about 3 minutes. Add the onions and mix  with the bacon then add the already browned stew beef back to the dutch oven.

Add the ale and beef stock.  Bring to a boil and scrape up any brown bits in pot.  Stir in brown sugar, vinegar, bay leaf and thyme. Add some salt and pepper to taste.

Bring the mixture to a boil and cover. Transfer to the oven and let it cook for 2 1/2 hours. Discard bay leaf and add some cooked carrots and potatoes if you desire.

Jägerschnitzel for #SundaySupper

This week’s Sunday Supper theme is Retro Recipes.  I was reminded a couple weeks ago about one of my favorite restaurants when I made some German Lentil Soup from Portland Oregon’s Der Rheinlander. The soup was great, but it was missing something. Something I loved to eat as a child – Jägerschnitzel.  It was one of the few ways I would eat mushrooms, the other being on supreme pizza.

Jägerschnitzel is basically a bacon mushroom cream sauce on a wiener-schnitzel  I had the recipe for Der Rheinlander’s basic schnitzel.  All I needed was some inspiration for a mushroom cream sauce.  I found a few on the web, but had an amazing mushroom cream sauce I’ve made many times before. Add some bacon and onions and I would be whisked back to the early 1980s eating a Jägerschnitzel in Portland.

I may have the oldest of the retro recipes in this week’s Sunday Supper event.  Both the Austrians and Italians claim to have invented the wiener-schnitzel. The Italians claim the dish was made in 1134 at a banquet for the canon of Milan’s St. Ambrogio Cathedral.

Now that’s retro.

Jägerschnitzel
Serves 4

4 veal scallopini, pounded thin
2 whole eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon milk
1 lemon, juice
1 1/2 cups bread crumbs
1/4 cup canola oil
2 tablespoons butter
flour, to coat
salt and pepper to taste
1 lemon cut into wedges

Mushroom Cream Sauce
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 cup cremini mushrooms, diced and quartered
1 tablespoon cream sherry
1 slice bacon, small diced
1/2 onion, diced
1 shallot, diced
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoons butter
small bunch parsley

For the schnitzel, wrap veal cutlets in cellophane and pound with a mallet. Heat a saute pan on medium-high heat with oil and butter

Rub some lemon juice over the veal and then dredge the veal in flour.  A simple way to do this is to use a gallon ziplock bag and place about a 1/2 cup flour in the bag and shake the bag to coat the veal.  Remove veal from bag and now with the egg and milk mixed together in small bowl, coat the flour dredged veal in the egg and shake so it is not dripping egg and coat with bread crumbs.

Add the bread crumb coated veal to the saute pan and cook on each side until the bread crumbs are nicely browned, not burned, about 3-4 minutes each side.  Remove the cooked veal from the saute pan and place on a plate.

Now to make the sauce, add the bacon and cook for about 2-3 minutes.  Add the mushrooms, onions, shallot, and thyme and cook for about 2 minutes then deglaze the pan with the cream sherry. Once the sherry has cooked off, about 1 minute, add the heavy cream and butter. Add the parsley and reduce heat to a simmer and place the cooked breaded veal back in the pan.

After letting flavors combine for a couple minutes, serve with spätzle and some vegetables.

Grilled Prosciutto Wrapped Chicken Breasts for #SundaySupper

Summertime grilling is one of my favorite times of the season.  When we used to live in Michigan, it felt extra special after long periods of bad weather.  Though I was one of the crazy people who would clear a path in the snow to the grill, dust off the layer of snow and fire it up in 20-degree evenings.

Now that we are in the land of no seasons – only summer – grilling outside in the summer sun feels just like any other day of the year. Trust me, I’m not complaining. Perhaps just bragging a bit.

For those still in places with seasons, a summer day grilling is a day filled with joy. Grilling is so easy. Heat. Place some food on it. Close the lid. Open a beer. Drink beer. Flip the food. Repeat. Serve.

Life is good with a grill.

Life is also really good if you get a chance to try jamón ibérico de bellota. It’s a Spanish version of Prosciutto that has the most amazing flavor, as it should. This delicacy ran $149/lb at my local market. I should note you don’t need this. A good imported prosciutto works just fine for this recipe.

The only reason I ended up buying a couple slices of jamón ibérico de bellota (2 thin slices came to $7) was due to a conversation with the deli guy.  He ask which Prosciutto do you want? I looked at a couple as he rattled off several common types and then added or you can go with the $149/lb one. What makes this particular meat special is that it comes from free-range pigs that roam the oak forest border of Spain and Portugal eating a diet of acorns then the meat is cured for 3 years.

Still $149 a pound?! Well I only need 2 thins slices so I said let’s do that. That sounds insane. He laughed and cut me a thin slice to try it first.  Bonus! Free crazy expensive jamón ibérico de bellota!

It was great like when you drink a high-quality pinot noir.  Sure the $20 bottle is great, but a $60 bottle shows off by being brilliant from the first sip to the end.  That’s kind of what this “prosciutto” reminded me of. It was brilliant from the first to last bite.

I doubt I’ll buy it regularly, but I might again for a pasta dish that uses a little to make the dish extra special.

The best moment with the jamón ibérico de bellota is when my wife tried it and said, “it tastes like bacon. I like it.”

Grilled Prosciutto Wrapped Chicken Breasts
Serves 4

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts
8 paper-thin slices Prosciutto
4 slices Fontina cheese
1 medium sized tomato
Salt and pepper to taste

Butterfly the chicken breasts by cutting each one almost in half. Fold the chicken breast out covering with cellophane and pound with a meat mallet to make flat.  Salt and pepper the chicken and then add a slice of Fontina cheese and thinly sliced tomato.  Fold over and secure with toothpicks.

Place each wrapped breast on the grill and cook for about 8 minutes per side to get a nice brown sear.  Remove from grill and then wrap each breast with two slices of prosciutto. Return to grill and heat for about 2 minutes then turn over to cook the other side another 2 minutes to make the prosciutto crispy being careful not to burn.

Remove from heat and serve with your favorite sides.

#SundaySupper End of Summer Grilled Peaches and Chicken Salad

This is my first time contributing a recipe to the great #SundaySupper group organized by Isabel.  This week’s theme is Back to School Meals.  Each recipe must be easy to make in less than 30 minutes making it an easy fit for cooking at home during a school night.

Well this is something I live by as the sole cook and income in our household, so coming home after a long day of work means I need to be able to make a great dinner with little time and with so many great peaches at our Farmers’ Markets here in Southern California I decided to do a simple, yet flavorful salad.

End of Summer Grilled Peaches and Chicken Salad
Serves 4

1 lb chicken, boneless skinless breasts
2 peaches
1 bunch of green or red leaf lettuce
4 oz. crumbled feta cheese
3/4 cup of olive oil
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
Salt and Pepper to taste

Heat grill for cooking chicken breasts and peaches.  In a bowl place 1/4 cup of olive oil and salt and pepper mixing together then coating boneless, skinless chicken breasts with mixture.  Place chicken breasts on half of the grill. Keeping the other half of grill free for cooking peaches. Cook chicken for about 10 minutes per side being sure not to burn.

Cut some ripe but not too soft peaches into halves and remove the pits.  Drizzle a small amount of olive oil on the exposed inside half of the peaches. Put them non-skin side down on the grill grates and cook for 5 minutes.

For the vinaigrette, mix 1/2 cup of olive oil, honey and balsamic. Whisk together and add some salt and pepper to taste.

Turn the peaches over and brush with small amount of honey balsamic vinaigrette blend. Turn them a couple times cooking skin and non-skin sides for a few more minutes on each side being sure not too burn. Remove from grill.

Meanwhile continue grilling chicken breasts and remove when finished.

Wash lettuce and slice chicken into smaller slices laying the peach half in the center of salad and sliced chicken to the side.  Sprinkle salad with crumbled feta cheese and drizzle honey vinaigrette dressing over salad.

Serve with slice of bread.

Chicken Artichoke Piccata for #SundaySupper

Honest, quality, home cooked meals is what chef Sara Moulton has embodied throughout her work on PBS, FoodNetwork, and her many cookbooks.  I personally haven’t followed Sara’s work as well as some other TV chefs; though, I’m not a big fan of the craziness surrounding the cook celebrity fandom that has become quite a spectacle in food circles. I like Sara’s work though because its not celebrity driven. She seems more genuine than some of the others out there plus she uses real ingredients and focuses on meals as family gathering and for that I’m happy this week’s Sunday Supper meal is a celebration of Sara’s cookbook Everyday Family Dinners.

This recipe is not in the cookbook, it is “inspired” by it though.  I wanted to make a dish that really could work everyday in the home kitchen. It takes around 20 minutes to make and tastes like you spent a lot more time on it. I suppose that’s the magic of garlic, wine and lemon juice.

If you’re interested in some of Sara’s recipes several of the other Sunday Supper bloggers made dishes and drinks from the cookbook.

Chicken Artichoke Piccata
Serves 4

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts
1 cup bread crumbs
3 tablespoon olive oil
1 jar of artichokes quarters, drained and rinsed
juice from 1/2 lemon
1/2 cup white wine
2 garlic cloves, sliced
1 teaspoon capers, rinsed
salt and pepper

Pound the chicken breasts with a mallet to flatten. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a medium-high saute pan.  In a shallow dish add bread crumbs, salt and pepper to taste.  Coat chicken breasts in 1 tablespoon of olive oil and then dip and coat in dish of bread crumbs. Add bread crumb covered chicken breasts to the pan and cook for about 4-5 minutes per side to brown, being sure to not burn.

Remove chicken from pan. Add garlic cloves and cook for a minute. Add white wine, lemon juice, capers, artichokes and return chicken to pan. Reduce liquid by half for about 3 minutes.

Remove and serve with a side dish or side salad.

Grilled Corn Asparagus Pasta with Brown Butter Breadcrumbs

Our family is moving closer to becoming vegetarian. For the past several years we have made it a point to eat 2 to 3 vegetarian dishes a week for dinner. The past year it’s been 4 or 5 dinners a week. Finding recipes that don’t use meat is not easy in a society that consumes so much of it.

When I find new vegetarian dishes that make me forget I’m not eating meat and thereby not missing it, it’s a good thing.

This dish sounded a bit odd, but I had bought some corn this week and wasn’t sure what do with it until I saw this post from one of my fellow Sunday Supper bloggers, Paula at Vintage Kitchen Notes. The thought of anything other than a marinara sauce on spaghetti noodles just feels foreign, which is pretty funny considering how experimental I am with food. Also, the dish really doesn’t have a sauce, it uses the brown butter and breadcrumbs to coat the noodles. And what no Parmigiano-Reggiano?  Feta? Feta on spaghetti? Sacreligious.

The dish does take some time, about 30-40 minutes. It is great for a quick weekend meal than a rushed after work meal.

The full recipe is below. I followed it with one exception. Stephanie doesn’t like jalapenos so I substituted red chili pepper flakes, 1/2 teaspoon.

San Antonio Puffy Tacos for #SundaySupper

One of my favorite things about being part of the SundaySupper bloggers is how the weekly themes make me think beyond what I might normally do as a home cook.  This week was definitely one of those times as I had to consider what would I make from my Recipe Bucket List. Problem was I don’t have a Recipe Bucket List. So, I thought what to do? I’ve made fresh ravioli, homemade oxtail gnocchi, stuffed chicken, and a few other things came to mind, but all things I’ve done. Then it hit me.  Puffy Tacos.

When I was in San Antonio doing training for a potential wireline union strike at the phone company I had a chance to stop at Los Barrios, a well-known Mexican restaurant famous for their puffy tacos. At first, I wasn’t impressed with the place. It looked like a local Chi-Chi’s with tile tabletops, typical Mexican-American menu combo plates, and a focus on margaritas.  I was ready to be unimpressed and back to my true South of the Border love – street tacos (I have another blog where I review ‘street tacos’ found at Gas Stations.)

I ordered what I came for: Puffy Tacos.  They were great and the margarita was pretty good too.  They’re definitely different from the typical street taco I love and still prefer over a puffy taco, but the tacos at Los Barrios were pretty darn good and I left pleased with my evening out in San Antonio.

With a Recipe Bucket List decision to be made and my now living in Los Angeles, not Dallas, it was going to be some time before I returned to San Antonio so why not try doing this dish at home. Well that is just what I did and while they were not as perfect as Los Barrios; they were pretty good and a solid 4 out of 5 rating from this taco reviewer.

What might of helped is having a deep fryer and some additional experimentation. Plus I had trouble finding fresh masa corn flour. There was some at a local natural food market last week, but when I returned this week they said they only carried it during the holidays.  Too bad. So I went to the market and found some masa harina from Bob’s Red Mill that worked nicely, better than I thought it would.  So if you can’t find fresh masa, don’t worry just use a good quality masa harina and carry-on.

Puffy Taco Tortillas
Makes 6-10 shells

2 cups fresh masa or good quality masa harina
1 cup warm water (if using masa harina)
1 tablespoon lard or butter
2 Tablespoons baking powder
Vegetable oil for frying

You’ll need a tortilla press to make this recipe. I recommend finding an authentic Mexican market and find a press that is entirely flat, no lip or shallow cutout as some have. Also the heavier feeling the press the better – cast iron is preferred.

Mix the masa and baking powder together if using masa harina. If using fresh masa, just put into a bowl.  Slowly add the warm water to your flour constantly combining with your hands and finally add the lard or butter (I microwaved butter for 5 seconds, soft not melted.)

Continue kneading together and add a little more water if it is too dry and crumbly.  Add a little more masa if it is too wet. You want it to feel smooth and not sticky.

Combine into a large ball and put into a Ziploc bag for 20 minutes.

Open the tortilla press and place a sheet of parchment paper on each side of the press.  Take out about 1 ½” inches of tortilla dough and roll into a smooth ball.  Press in the center of the press.

Put the tortilla on a hot griddle or heavy non-stick pan.  Let it cook for 20-30 seconds on each side.  With a spatula remove it and place it into another pan with about a 1” of hot oil.

Let the tortilla fry for about 20 seconds it will begin to puff. With a spatula and some tongs navigate the frying tortilla to give it a center, “V” like form. Continue frying for about 1 minute working to maximize the puffiness of the tortilla. Remove from oil and place on a plate lined with paper towel.

Continue with remaining dough then fill with your favorite filling.

Puffy Taco Filling
Makes 6-8 tacos

1 lb ground beef
½ small red onion, minced
½ green pepper, minced
½ tsp cumin
¼ tsp garlic powder
salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp tomato paste
1 ripe tomato, diced
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
2 cups chopped lettuce

Mix beef with cumin, garlic powder, salt and pepper. Heat ground beef in a pan over medium-high heat.  Break up the meat and cook for about 6-8 minutes. Add the onion, bell pepper and tomato paste.  Mix in pan and cook for about another 2-3 minutes.

Put cooked beef mixture into a puffy taco then top with tomato, cheese and lettuce.  Serve with some hot sauce like Tapatio and a couple cut limes.

Broccoli Patties with Arugula and Champagne Vinaigrette for #SundaySupper

This week’s Sunday Supper is all about the Skinny.  One thing that has helped keep our family less-thick was our move to more vegetarian meals. Most of our decision to go vegetarian 3-4 times a week came from Mark Bittman’s New York Times article “The Meat Guzzler.”  Besides the benefit of eating less meat and its more positive environmental impact and the fact that we changed to eating more expensive, local grass-fed meats to support local ranchers, we also benefitted from the smart at home vegetarian made meals.

One of my favorite vegetarian dishes is variations on potato pancakes.  Here I use broccoli, but you can use zucchini, squash, carrots and of course potatoes. It’s a fairly flexible recipe.  I really prefer the broccoli version though as it goes well with a champagne vinaigrette.

Broccoli Patties with Arugula and Champagne Vinaigrette
Serves 4-6

6 cups broccoli, chopped
2 eggs
1 cup flour
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 cup parmesan cheese
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
pinch of red pepper flakes
olive oil for frying

arugula

1/4 cup champagne vinegar
1 tsp dijon mustard
1/2 cup olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Chop the broccoli into bite-sized chunks then steam using a steamer or boil for 5 minutes.  After cooking, set aside to cool.

In a large bowl add eggs, flour and parmasen cheese. Mix together.  Add broccoli, bread crumbs, garlic, pepper flakes and salt and pepper.  Combine everything and then using a potato masher, combine everything so the broccoli is still noticeable, but not too big.

Heat a non-stick pan on medium-high heat. When hot add the oil. Scoop out broccoli mixture into a large ball and then gently press the ball into a flat pancake while in the pan.  You should be able to fit 3-4 in a pan.  Heat and flip after about 4-5 minutes, making sure not to burn but still getting a nice crust on each side. Place finished patties on paper towel and continue making until mixture is finished.

To make the dressing, combine the vinegar and dijon mustard.  Season with salt and pepper then pour in the olive oil slowly combining constantly to keep the dressing thick. Whisk to finish combining and add more oil if vinegar is too strong.
Arrange arugula on a plate with two broccoli patties and then drizzle dressing over everything. Serve.

Street Tacos al Pastor for #SundaySupper

September 16th is Día de Independencia in Mexico (Mexico’s Independence Day) and to celebrate the group of bloggers from #SundaySupper decided to feature Mexican dishes.  As someone who has another blog entirely dedicated to my favorite Mexican food — Tacos — I was excited to try making something I have always wanted to attempt.

Tacos al Pastor is my go to taco when I am out doing taco reviews on GasStationTacos.com.  It’s my test to see if the taqueria is sub par, average or amazing. If you have never enjoyed an al pastor taco, you are in for a treat provided you find a place (or recipe) that is at least average and hopefully amazing.

I’ve had amazing a few times.  The most memorable is from this gas station in Dallas, Texas:

They make it on a vertical spit something most home cooks don’t own, myself included. Sadly this recipe isn’t a match for some of the amazing pastor tacos in my history, but that doesn’t mean you should stop reading or ignore this recipe.  It just means the recipe here is above average and is a solid choice for homemade al pastor.  Granted I’ll probably try some other things next time, like increasing or modifying the chiles used as I prefer a bit more spice.

My wife really liked this recipe and thought the tacos were really good. Note this was her first time having al pastor tacos, because she will not eat at the gas stations or taco trucks I like to frequent.  Her loss.

So here is my virgin attempt at al pastor.

You will need to find a Mexican market as you’ll need a coupe things you probably won’t find at the typical grocery store.  Achiote paste and dried guajillos chiles are two things I had to find after striking out here in LA at Whole Foods.

Tacos al Pastor
Serves 4

16 corn tortillas
1/2 cup oil
2 lbs pork butt, trimmed of some of the outer fat and cut into 1″ “steaks”
1/2 pineapple
1 red onion, diced
1 bunch cilantro, diced
4 limes, cut into quarters
salt

Anchiote Marinade
2 oranges, juice only
1/2 cup anchiote paste
10 dry guajillos chiles
1 onion
4 garlic cloves
1 cup white vinegar
1 cinnamon stick
salt and pepper to taste

Prepare the marinade by soaking the dried gualjillos chiles in hot water for about 10 minutes.  Add the softened chiles to a blender with the rest of the ingredients and blend until fully combined.  Pour the marinade over the pork butt, cut into 1″ thick “steaks” and refrigerate for about 3 hours.

Heat your grill and add the pork.  Cook the pork for about 20 minutes turning halfway through and pounding the pork with some grill tongs. You want to soften the pork and thin it while it is cooking.  For the last 5 minutes of grilling add some rounds of pineapple.

While waiting for everything to grill, soften the tortillas by heating some oil in a saute pan on the stove.  Quickly add the tortillas for just a second on each side and place on papper towel patting them to remove any excess oil.

Remove the pork and pineapple.  Chop the pork and cut the pineapple into small pieces mixing all of it together.  In a separate bowl mix the red onion, cilantro, squeeze of lime and salt.

Prepare 3 to 4 tacos per plate and place some pork and pineapple mixture onto each tortilla and top with the onion and cilantro mixture.

Serve with some hot sauce and fresh limes.